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Viral load is strongly associated with length of stay in adults hospitalised with viral acute respiratory illness

Viral load is strongly associated with length of stay in adults hospitalised with viral acute respiratory illness
Viral load is strongly associated with length of stay in adults hospitalised with viral acute respiratory illness
Background: respiratory viruses are detectable in a large proportion of adults hospitalised with acute respiratory illness. For influenza and other viruses there is evidence that viral load and persistence are associated with certain clinical outcomes but it is not known if there is an association between viral load and hospital length of stay.

Methods: 306 adults hospitalised with viral acute respiratory illness were studied. Associations between viral load and length of stay were examined. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to control for age, comorbidity, influenza vaccine status, duration of illness prior to hospitalisation, bacterial co-infection, clinical group and virus subtype.

Results: high viral load was associated with a longer duration of hospitalisation for all patients (p <0.0001). This remained significant across all virus types and clinical groups and when adjusted for age, comorbidity, duration of illness prior to hospitalisation, bacterial co-infection and other factors.

Conclusions: high viral loads are associated with prolonged hospital length of stay in adults with viral acute respiratory illness. This further supports existing evidence demonstrating that viral acute respiratory illness is a viral load driven process and suggests that viral load could be used in clinical practise to predict prolonged hospitalisation and prioritise antivirals.

International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 21521552

0163-4453
598-606
Clark, Tristan
712ec18e-613c-45df-a013-c8a22834e14f
Ewings, Sean
326656df-c0f0-44a1-b64f-8fe9578ca18a
Medina, Marie-jo
274a2197-02a0-45c5-ab9e-ced40e6ee858
Batham, Sally
59139c9b-9824-4e28-a71e-9b9efb59233c
Curran, Martin D.
d6e4ebd3-f09a-4934-9d76-d6bc09fa586d
Parmar, Surendra
9bd8437a-4896-415d-b9f6-8b57901a57a9
Nicholson, Karl G.
ce228d66-ac76-4121-b9a6-a50027f51b42
Clark, Tristan
712ec18e-613c-45df-a013-c8a22834e14f
Ewings, Sean
326656df-c0f0-44a1-b64f-8fe9578ca18a
Medina, Marie-jo
274a2197-02a0-45c5-ab9e-ced40e6ee858
Batham, Sally
59139c9b-9824-4e28-a71e-9b9efb59233c
Curran, Martin D.
d6e4ebd3-f09a-4934-9d76-d6bc09fa586d
Parmar, Surendra
9bd8437a-4896-415d-b9f6-8b57901a57a9
Nicholson, Karl G.
ce228d66-ac76-4121-b9a6-a50027f51b42

Clark, Tristan, Ewings, Sean, Medina, Marie-jo, Batham, Sally, Curran, Martin D., Parmar, Surendra and Nicholson, Karl G. (2016) Viral load is strongly associated with length of stay in adults hospitalised with viral acute respiratory illness. Journal of Infection, 73 (6), 598-606. (doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2016.09.001). (PMID:27615557)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: respiratory viruses are detectable in a large proportion of adults hospitalised with acute respiratory illness. For influenza and other viruses there is evidence that viral load and persistence are associated with certain clinical outcomes but it is not known if there is an association between viral load and hospital length of stay.

Methods: 306 adults hospitalised with viral acute respiratory illness were studied. Associations between viral load and length of stay were examined. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to control for age, comorbidity, influenza vaccine status, duration of illness prior to hospitalisation, bacterial co-infection, clinical group and virus subtype.

Results: high viral load was associated with a longer duration of hospitalisation for all patients (p <0.0001). This remained significant across all virus types and clinical groups and when adjusted for age, comorbidity, duration of illness prior to hospitalisation, bacterial co-infection and other factors.

Conclusions: high viral loads are associated with prolonged hospital length of stay in adults with viral acute respiratory illness. This further supports existing evidence demonstrating that viral acute respiratory illness is a viral load driven process and suggests that viral load could be used in clinical practise to predict prolonged hospitalisation and prioritise antivirals.

International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 21521552

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Accepted/In Press date: 2 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 September 2016
Published date: December 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400474
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400474
ISSN: 0163-4453
PURE UUID: d8670644-f682-4626-82d4-0001f8d8dde7
ORCID for Tristan Clark: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6026-5295
ORCID for Sean Ewings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7214-4917

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Date deposited: 16 Sep 2016 13:18
Last modified: 04 Jul 2020 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Tristan Clark ORCID iD
Author: Sean Ewings ORCID iD
Author: Marie-jo Medina
Author: Sally Batham
Author: Martin D. Curran
Author: Surendra Parmar
Author: Karl G. Nicholson

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