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A systematic review with meta-analysis of the role of anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome onset

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the role of anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome onset
A systematic review with meta-analysis of the role of anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome onset
It is well established that people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have higher levels of anxiety and depression compared with controls. However, the role of these as risk factors is less clearly established. The aims of this systematic review were to investigate: (1) whether anxiety and/or depression predict IBS onset; (2) the size of the relative risk (RR) of anxiety versus depression in IBS onset. Subgroup analyses explored if methodological factors affected the overall findings.

Prospective cohort or case–control studies were included if they: (1) focused on the development of IBS in population-based or gastroenteritis cohorts; (2) explored the effects of anxiety and/or depression at baseline as predictors of IBS onset at a future point. In all, 11 studies were included of which eight recruited participants with a gastrointestinal infection. Meta-analyses were conducted.

The risk of developing IBS was double for anxiety cases at baseline compared with those who were not [RR 2.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.58–3.60]. Similar results were found for depression (RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.44–2.96). Anxiety and depression seemed to play a stronger role in IBS onset in individuals with a gastrointestinal infection although this could be attributed to other differences in methodology, such as use of diagnostic interviews rather than self-report.

The findings suggest that self-reported anxiety and depression provide a twofold risk for IBS onset. There is less support for the role of anxiety or depressive disorder diagnosed using clinical interview. These findings may have implications for the development of interventions focused on IBS prevention and treatment.
0033-2917
1-16
Sibelli, A.
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Chalder, T.
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Everitt, H.
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Workman, P.
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Windgassen, S.
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Moss-Morris, R.
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e
Sibelli, A.
0a22f913-018c-4165-b223-4ee2c86f8ffa
Chalder, T.
c4ee032d-a525-4b6f-a4f1-3edb878bbe15
Everitt, H.
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Workman, P.
9da219ec-b3a1-4dfd-8f9a-58ea6be3f136
Windgassen, S.
9fb3203e-5ed5-4a93-9eab-4a1f58bb6373
Moss-Morris, R.
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e

Sibelli, A., Chalder, T., Everitt, H., Workman, P., Windgassen, S. and Moss-Morris, R. (2016) A systematic review with meta-analysis of the role of anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome onset. Psychological Medicine, 1-16. (doi:10.1017/S0033291716001987).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It is well established that people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have higher levels of anxiety and depression compared with controls. However, the role of these as risk factors is less clearly established. The aims of this systematic review were to investigate: (1) whether anxiety and/or depression predict IBS onset; (2) the size of the relative risk (RR) of anxiety versus depression in IBS onset. Subgroup analyses explored if methodological factors affected the overall findings.

Prospective cohort or case–control studies were included if they: (1) focused on the development of IBS in population-based or gastroenteritis cohorts; (2) explored the effects of anxiety and/or depression at baseline as predictors of IBS onset at a future point. In all, 11 studies were included of which eight recruited participants with a gastrointestinal infection. Meta-analyses were conducted.

The risk of developing IBS was double for anxiety cases at baseline compared with those who were not [RR 2.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.58–3.60]. Similar results were found for depression (RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.44–2.96). Anxiety and depression seemed to play a stronger role in IBS onset in individuals with a gastrointestinal infection although this could be attributed to other differences in methodology, such as use of diagnostic interviews rather than self-report.

The findings suggest that self-reported anxiety and depression provide a twofold risk for IBS onset. There is less support for the role of anxiety or depressive disorder diagnosed using clinical interview. These findings may have implications for the development of interventions focused on IBS prevention and treatment.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 September 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400626
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400626
ISSN: 0033-2917
PURE UUID: 1fdcebeb-4009-4652-b4f4-e3e9fecd283b
ORCID for H. Everitt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-8403

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Date deposited: 20 Sep 2016 12:29
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

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Contributors

Author: A. Sibelli
Author: T. Chalder
Author: H. Everitt ORCID iD
Author: P. Workman
Author: S. Windgassen
Author: R. Moss-Morris

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