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The impact of limiting long term illness on internal migration in England and Wales: New evidence from census microdata

The impact of limiting long term illness on internal migration in England and Wales: New evidence from census microdata
The impact of limiting long term illness on internal migration in England and Wales: New evidence from census microdata
Previous research has suggested that poor health is associated with reduced migration; this knowledge
stems from models based on past censuses, or longitudinal studies which imply that the factors influencing migration are the same between those in good and poor health. This paper addresses these issuesby utilising health-stratified analyses on the 2011 Census Individual Secure Sample for England and Wales.

Multilevel models predict the odds of moving for working age adults, controlling for key predictors of migration, estimating the effect of health status on the odds of moving and the destination specific variance in migration.

We find that those in poor health are less likely to move, after controlling for individual level characteristics. In contrast with expectations, economic inactivity, marriage and being in African, Caribbean, Black, Other or Mixed ethnic groups were not significant predictors of
migration among the unhealthy sample, but were for the healthy sample.

We conclude that migration is health-selective and propose implications for understanding area level concentrations of poor health in England and Wales.
0277-9536
107-115
Wilding, Sam
1f316b8b-db59-4289-b6aa-183f957f3470
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Wilding, Sam
1f316b8b-db59-4289-b6aa-183f957f3470
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4

Wilding, Sam, Martin, David and Moon, Graham (2016) The impact of limiting long term illness on internal migration in England and Wales: New evidence from census microdata. Social Science & Medicine, 167, 107-115. (doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.08.046).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous research has suggested that poor health is associated with reduced migration; this knowledge
stems from models based on past censuses, or longitudinal studies which imply that the factors influencing migration are the same between those in good and poor health. This paper addresses these issuesby utilising health-stratified analyses on the 2011 Census Individual Secure Sample for England and Wales.

Multilevel models predict the odds of moving for working age adults, controlling for key predictors of migration, estimating the effect of health status on the odds of moving and the destination specific variance in migration.

We find that those in poor health are less likely to move, after controlling for individual level characteristics. In contrast with expectations, economic inactivity, marriage and being in African, Caribbean, Black, Other or Mixed ethnic groups were not significant predictors of
migration among the unhealthy sample, but were for the healthy sample.

We conclude that migration is health-selective and propose implications for understanding area level concentrations of poor health in England and Wales.

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Submitted date: 22 February 2016
Accepted/In Press date: 27 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 August 2016
Published date: October 2016
Organisations: Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400697
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400697
ISSN: 0277-9536
PURE UUID: 6ab6d3a8-683e-48ac-90dc-76677497db72
ORCID for David Martin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0397-0769
ORCID for Graham Moon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7256-8397

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Date deposited: 23 Sep 2016 13:16
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:09

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