The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Laser direct writing of programmable delays for fabrication of paper-based sensors that allow CRP detection

Laser direct writing of programmable delays for fabrication of paper-based sensors that allow CRP detection
Laser direct writing of programmable delays for fabrication of paper-based sensors that allow CRP detection
Demand for low-cost alternatives to conventional medical diagnostic sensors has been the driving force that has spurred significant developments in the diagnostics field. Paper-based fluidic devices, proposed by the Whitesides’ group in 2007, have been regarded as one such alternative. Research into the development of methodologies that control, and in particular delay the flow of fluids in these devices is an urgently needed requirement that would enable greater functionalities in such paper-based sensors.
In this work, to control fluid-flow, we report the use of a new laser-based direct-write technique that allows programmable fluid delivery in channels within a paper-based device. The technique is based on laser-induced photo-polymerisation, and through adjustment of the laser writing parameters, such as the output power and writing/scanning speed, we can control the porosity of hydrophobic barriers which, when introduced in the fluid paths, produce controllable fluid delay.
Having patterned these barriers at pre-defined locations within fluidic channels, we have achieved flow-delays with a time span ranging from few minutes to an hour and we have also performed a study to understand the influence of the number of barriers and their position on the flow-delay. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of such programmable flow delays through a semi-automated paper-sensor that implements a multi-step ELISA for detection of C-reactive protein with a limit-of-detection of 10 ng/mL (Figure 2) - wherein separate flow-arms (with differently programmed delays) were used to sequentially deliver the different reagents through to the detection zone for effecting the multi-step assay.
Since the channels and flow delay barriers can be written via a common laser-writing process, this is a distinct improvement over other methods that require specialist operating environments, or custom-designed equipment. This technique can therefore be used for rapid fabrication of paper-based microfluidic sensors that can perform single or multistep analytical assays.
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8

He, Peijun, Katis, Ioannis, Eason, Robert and Sones, Collin (2016) Laser direct writing of programmable delays for fabrication of paper-based sensors that allow CRP detection. BIOSENSORS 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden. 24 - 26 May 2016.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Demand for low-cost alternatives to conventional medical diagnostic sensors has been the driving force that has spurred significant developments in the diagnostics field. Paper-based fluidic devices, proposed by the Whitesides’ group in 2007, have been regarded as one such alternative. Research into the development of methodologies that control, and in particular delay the flow of fluids in these devices is an urgently needed requirement that would enable greater functionalities in such paper-based sensors.
In this work, to control fluid-flow, we report the use of a new laser-based direct-write technique that allows programmable fluid delivery in channels within a paper-based device. The technique is based on laser-induced photo-polymerisation, and through adjustment of the laser writing parameters, such as the output power and writing/scanning speed, we can control the porosity of hydrophobic barriers which, when introduced in the fluid paths, produce controllable fluid delay.
Having patterned these barriers at pre-defined locations within fluidic channels, we have achieved flow-delays with a time span ranging from few minutes to an hour and we have also performed a study to understand the influence of the number of barriers and their position on the flow-delay. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of such programmable flow delays through a semi-automated paper-sensor that implements a multi-step ELISA for detection of C-reactive protein with a limit-of-detection of 10 ng/mL (Figure 2) - wherein separate flow-arms (with differently programmed delays) were used to sequentially deliver the different reagents through to the detection zone for effecting the multi-step assay.
Since the channels and flow delay barriers can be written via a common laser-writing process, this is a distinct improvement over other methods that require specialist operating environments, or custom-designed equipment. This technique can therefore be used for rapid fabrication of paper-based microfluidic sensors that can perform single or multistep analytical assays.

Text
Laser direct write for introduction of programmable delay in paper.pdf - Other
Download (61kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 May 2016
Venue - Dates: BIOSENSORS 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2016-05-24 - 2016-05-26
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400762
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400762
PURE UUID: 6fc730fd-820a-465d-a221-e93198f6e785
ORCID for Ioannis Katis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2016-557X
ORCID for Robert Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Sep 2016 10:44
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:23

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×