The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A genetic analysis of individual differences in dissociative behaviors in childhood and adolescence

A genetic analysis of individual differences in dissociative behaviors in childhood and adolescence
A genetic analysis of individual differences in dissociative behaviors in childhood and adolescence
Background: dissociation – a pattern of general disruption in memory and consciousness – has been found to be an important cognitive component of children's and adults' coping with severe trauma. Dissociative experiences include amnesia, identity disturbance, age regression, difficulty with concentration, and trance states. Stable individual differences in dissociative behaviors may represent a dissociative tendency trait that varies in the population independent of the influence of trauma.
Method: in the current study, we examined genetic and environmental sources of variance in some of these behaviors by comparing 86 pairs of adoptive siblings and 102 pairs of full siblings from the Colorado Adoption Project (parents' and teachers' ratings), and 218 pairs of identical and 173 pairs of same-sex fraternal twins from the British Register for Child Twins (parents' ratings). The study used a dissociation scale comprised of six CBCL items.
Results: developmentally, there was no change in mean dissociation scores across middle childhood and adolescence, and individual differences were moderately stable. Both parents' and teachers' ratings showed moderate to substantial amounts of genetic and nonshared environmental variance and negligible shared environmental variance, and most of the parent–teacher agreement in their ratings was accounted for by overlapping genetic variance.
Conclusions: the results support further research into possible genetic and environmental factors that contribute to dissociative tendencies in children and adolescents.
0021-9630
522-532
Becker-Blease, Kathryn A.
5eb31a57-6374-4519-91be-2c3e6b035e10
Deater-Deckard, Kirby
ebdb8311-a883-4741-be45-bb8e1ae2d4c4
Eley, Thalia
af5a6b8d-641d-430c-b6e2-1ca5a85f353b
Freyd, Jennifer
705c0312-8679-452d-8ec1-3fa98f7ff650
Stevenson, Jim
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1
Plomin, Robert
556f296a-0ec6-4b68-b2b8-57872652b242
Becker-Blease, Kathryn A.
5eb31a57-6374-4519-91be-2c3e6b035e10
Deater-Deckard, Kirby
ebdb8311-a883-4741-be45-bb8e1ae2d4c4
Eley, Thalia
af5a6b8d-641d-430c-b6e2-1ca5a85f353b
Freyd, Jennifer
705c0312-8679-452d-8ec1-3fa98f7ff650
Stevenson, Jim
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1
Plomin, Robert
556f296a-0ec6-4b68-b2b8-57872652b242

Becker-Blease, Kathryn A., Deater-Deckard, Kirby, Eley, Thalia, Freyd, Jennifer, Stevenson, Jim and Plomin, Robert (2004) A genetic analysis of individual differences in dissociative behaviors in childhood and adolescence. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 45 (3), 522-532. (doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00242.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: dissociation – a pattern of general disruption in memory and consciousness – has been found to be an important cognitive component of children's and adults' coping with severe trauma. Dissociative experiences include amnesia, identity disturbance, age regression, difficulty with concentration, and trance states. Stable individual differences in dissociative behaviors may represent a dissociative tendency trait that varies in the population independent of the influence of trauma.
Method: in the current study, we examined genetic and environmental sources of variance in some of these behaviors by comparing 86 pairs of adoptive siblings and 102 pairs of full siblings from the Colorado Adoption Project (parents' and teachers' ratings), and 218 pairs of identical and 173 pairs of same-sex fraternal twins from the British Register for Child Twins (parents' ratings). The study used a dissociation scale comprised of six CBCL items.
Results: developmentally, there was no change in mean dissociation scores across middle childhood and adolescence, and individual differences were moderately stable. Both parents' and teachers' ratings showed moderate to substantial amounts of genetic and nonshared environmental variance and negligible shared environmental variance, and most of the parent–teacher agreement in their ratings was accounted for by overlapping genetic variance.
Conclusions: the results support further research into possible genetic and environmental factors that contribute to dissociative tendencies in children and adolescents.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40080
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40080
ISSN: 0021-9630
PURE UUID: fb103059-3b3f-4cf4-910f-0f54f66b2e05

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jul 2006
Last modified: 10 May 2019 16:31

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×