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The fascist new man in France, 1919-1945

The fascist new man in France, 1919-1945
The fascist new man in France, 1919-1945
The fact that interwar France was apparently saturated with ‘new men’ forces us to reconsider how we understand the meaning of this construction. What does it say for the presumptive link between the ‘new man’ and totalitarian politics that The chapter’s starting point is the recognition that the ‘new man’ travelled widely in France, as a term and as a concept. It flourished during the years of interwar democracy and under the authoritarian Vichy regime (1940-1944). Indeed, it was not restricted to the radical right, nor even to political radicalism, and the most overt articulation of an ‘ideal type’ came from scientific eugenicists critical of totalitarianism. In pointing to these other variants—Catholic, imperialist, liberal, conservative—the chapter shows how the ‘new man’ imagined in the rhetoric of the radical right was forged out of inherited cultural resources and elements of normative masculinity. This plurality is telling: it makes us reconsider the relationship between the ‘new man’ and the radical right altogether, and it opens up the possibility of thinking more generally about how the aesthetics and rituals around manliness might have functioned politically in this era.
253-273
Bloomsbury Academic
Tumblety, Joan
8742e0ca-a9c0-4d16-832f-b3ef643efd7b
Feldman, Matthew
Dagnino, Jorge
Stocker, Paul
Tumblety, Joan
8742e0ca-a9c0-4d16-832f-b3ef643efd7b
Feldman, Matthew
Dagnino, Jorge
Stocker, Paul

Tumblety, Joan (2018) The fascist new man in France, 1919-1945. In, Feldman, Matthew, Dagnino, Jorge and Stocker, Paul (eds.) The ‘New Man’ in Radical Right Ideology and Practice, 1919-1945. London, GB. Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 253-273.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The fact that interwar France was apparently saturated with ‘new men’ forces us to reconsider how we understand the meaning of this construction. What does it say for the presumptive link between the ‘new man’ and totalitarian politics that The chapter’s starting point is the recognition that the ‘new man’ travelled widely in France, as a term and as a concept. It flourished during the years of interwar democracy and under the authoritarian Vichy regime (1940-1944). Indeed, it was not restricted to the radical right, nor even to political radicalism, and the most overt articulation of an ‘ideal type’ came from scientific eugenicists critical of totalitarianism. In pointing to these other variants—Catholic, imperialist, liberal, conservative—the chapter shows how the ‘new man’ imagined in the rhetoric of the radical right was forged out of inherited cultural resources and elements of normative masculinity. This plurality is telling: it makes us reconsider the relationship between the ‘new man’ and the radical right altogether, and it opens up the possibility of thinking more generally about how the aesthetics and rituals around manliness might have functioned politically in this era.

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More information

Submitted date: 5 April 2016
Published date: 5 January 2018
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400883
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400883
PURE UUID: d08c7e9a-0b2b-4453-927a-55cfdf31e9a6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Sep 2016 08:44
Last modified: 09 Apr 2018 16:31

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Contributors

Author: Joan Tumblety
Editor: Matthew Feldman
Editor: Jorge Dagnino
Editor: Paul Stocker

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