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Formulating dissociative identity disorder in clinical practice: a Q-study

Formulating dissociative identity disorder in clinical practice: a Q-study
Formulating dissociative identity disorder in clinical practice: a Q-study
Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is a complex and often poorly understood dissociative disorder, characterised by disruption of identity with the presence of two or more distinct personality states (APA, 2013). Several theoretical models have been proposed to provide a framework within which to understand this client group. However little i known about the conceptualisation of this presentation by therapists working clinically with this population. The current study aimed to explore the subjective options of therapists regarding the conceptualisation of DID in clinical practice. Q-methodology was used in order to operationalise and analyse these subjective beliefs. A Q set of 54 statements was created from previously reported interview data (Stokoe, 2014) with clinicians who had significant experience in working with clients with DID. The Q set was then administered to 18 therapist participants, who were asked to Q sort the statements in relation to how essential the items were conceptualising or ‘formulating’ DID. Factor analysis identified three factors, suggesting the presence of three differing perspectives regarding the ‘essential’ features of the formulation of DID. Factor A focused on “Trauma, attachment and the internal system”, whilst Factor B, “The conscious experience of DID” prioritised the everyday experience of DID and Factor C emphasised the “Helpful aspects of DID Compartmentalising emotions to enable functioning”. There was consensus across all three factors regarding the ‘least essential’ items to include in their formulations. However, the identification of three statistically distinct factors indicates the existence of differing viewpoints amongst the therapist participants.
Davis, Laura
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Davis, Laura
99bf84c9-9206-4b57-b619-a5831cff4156
Stopa, Lusia
b52f29fc-d1c2-450d-b321-68f95fa22c40
Maguire, Tess
64dbb526-9218-490b-84f0-06945a5adaae
Stokoe, Nicole
235dd28e-1c9f-4697-a1e9-8850022959e8

Davis, Laura (2016) Formulating dissociative identity disorder in clinical practice: a Q-study University of Southampton, School of Psychology, Doctoral Thesis , 145pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is a complex and often poorly understood dissociative disorder, characterised by disruption of identity with the presence of two or more distinct personality states (APA, 2013). Several theoretical models have been proposed to provide a framework within which to understand this client group. However little i known about the conceptualisation of this presentation by therapists working clinically with this population. The current study aimed to explore the subjective options of therapists regarding the conceptualisation of DID in clinical practice. Q-methodology was used in order to operationalise and analyse these subjective beliefs. A Q set of 54 statements was created from previously reported interview data (Stokoe, 2014) with clinicians who had significant experience in working with clients with DID. The Q set was then administered to 18 therapist participants, who were asked to Q sort the statements in relation to how essential the items were conceptualising or ‘formulating’ DID. Factor analysis identified three factors, suggesting the presence of three differing perspectives regarding the ‘essential’ features of the formulation of DID. Factor A focused on “Trauma, attachment and the internal system”, whilst Factor B, “The conscious experience of DID” prioritised the everyday experience of DID and Factor C emphasised the “Helpful aspects of DID Compartmentalising emotions to enable functioning”. There was consensus across all three factors regarding the ‘least essential’ items to include in their formulations. However, the identification of three statistically distinct factors indicates the existence of differing viewpoints amongst the therapist participants.

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Published date: March 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400975
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400975
PURE UUID: 8337f801-854f-48c1-92a8-025635be287f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Oct 2016 14:37
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 18:07

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Contributors

Author: Laura Davis
Thesis advisor: Lusia Stopa
Thesis advisor: Tess Maguire
Thesis advisor: Nicole Stokoe

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