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Using epigenomic studies in monozygotic twins to improve our understanding of cancer

Using epigenomic studies in monozygotic twins to improve our understanding of cancer
Using epigenomic studies in monozygotic twins to improve our understanding of cancer
Cancer is a set of diseases that exhibit not only genetic mutations but also a profoundly distorted epigenetic landscape. Over the last two decades, great advances have been made in identifying these alterations and their importance in the initiation and progression of cancer. Epigenetic changes can be seen from the very early stages in tumorigenesis and dysregulation of the epigenome has an increasingly acknowledged pathogenic role. Epigenomic twin studies have great potential to contribute to our understanding of complex diseases, such as cancer. This is because the use of monozygotic twins discordant for cancer enables epigenetic variation analysis without the confounding influence of the constitutive genetic background, age or cohort effects. It therefore allows the identification of susceptibility loci that may be sensitive to modification by the environment. These studies into cancer etiology will potentially lead to robust epigenetic markers for the detection and risk assessment of cancer
1750-1911
299-309
Roos, Leonie
70d8ead4-e032-4422-bb5a-c36f31d471a2
Spector, Timothy D.
a60c3efb-6833-43f0-bfaa-f39466f1f0eb
Bell, Christopher G.
44982df7-0746-4cdb-bed1-0bdfe68f1a64
Roos, Leonie
70d8ead4-e032-4422-bb5a-c36f31d471a2
Spector, Timothy D.
a60c3efb-6833-43f0-bfaa-f39466f1f0eb
Bell, Christopher G.
44982df7-0746-4cdb-bed1-0bdfe68f1a64

Roos, Leonie, Spector, Timothy D. and Bell, Christopher G. (2014) Using epigenomic studies in monozygotic twins to improve our understanding of cancer. Epigenomics, 6 (3), 299-309. (doi:10.2217/epi.14.13). (PMID:25111484)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cancer is a set of diseases that exhibit not only genetic mutations but also a profoundly distorted epigenetic landscape. Over the last two decades, great advances have been made in identifying these alterations and their importance in the initiation and progression of cancer. Epigenetic changes can be seen from the very early stages in tumorigenesis and dysregulation of the epigenome has an increasingly acknowledged pathogenic role. Epigenomic twin studies have great potential to contribute to our understanding of complex diseases, such as cancer. This is because the use of monozygotic twins discordant for cancer enables epigenetic variation analysis without the confounding influence of the constitutive genetic background, age or cohort effects. It therefore allows the identification of susceptibility loci that may be sensitive to modification by the environment. These studies into cancer etiology will potentially lead to robust epigenetic markers for the detection and risk assessment of cancer

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Published date: June 2014
Organisations: Human Development & Health, Centre for Biological Sciences, MRC Life-Course Epidemiology Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400982
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400982
ISSN: 1750-1911
PURE UUID: e354d62a-2286-4852-a6a9-df6f44ed2ec2
ORCID for Christopher G. Bell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4601-1242

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2016 07:53
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:34

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