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The epigenomic interface between genome and environment in common complex diseases

The epigenomic interface between genome and environment in common complex diseases
The epigenomic interface between genome and environment in common complex diseases
The epigenome plays the pivotal role as interface between genome and environment. True genome-wide assessments of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation (methylomes) or chromatin modifications (chromatinomes), are now possible, either through high-throughput arrays or increasingly by second-generation DNA sequencing methods. The ability to collect these data at this level of resolution enables us to begin to be able to propose detailed questions, and interrogate this information, with regards to changes that occur due to development, lineage and tissue-specificity, and significantly those caused by environmental influence, such as ageing, stress, diet, hormones or toxins. Common complex traits are under variable levels of genetic influence and additionally epigenetic effect. The detection of pathological epigenetic alterations will reveal additional insights into their aetiology and how possible environmental modulation of this mechanism may occur. Due to the reversibility of these marks, the potential for sequence-specific targeted therapeutics exists. This review surveys recent epigenomic advances and their current and prospective application to the study of common diseases
2041-2649
477-85
Bell, Christopher G.
44982df7-0746-4cdb-bed1-0bdfe68f1a64
Beck, Stephan
50f0c07a-19a8-4bca-adbc-af41a3800412
Bell, Christopher G.
44982df7-0746-4cdb-bed1-0bdfe68f1a64
Beck, Stephan
50f0c07a-19a8-4bca-adbc-af41a3800412

Bell, Christopher G. and Beck, Stephan (2010) The epigenomic interface between genome and environment in common complex diseases. Briefings in Functional Genomics, 9 (5-6), 477-85. (doi:10.1093/bfgp/elq026).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The epigenome plays the pivotal role as interface between genome and environment. True genome-wide assessments of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation (methylomes) or chromatin modifications (chromatinomes), are now possible, either through high-throughput arrays or increasingly by second-generation DNA sequencing methods. The ability to collect these data at this level of resolution enables us to begin to be able to propose detailed questions, and interrogate this information, with regards to changes that occur due to development, lineage and tissue-specificity, and significantly those caused by environmental influence, such as ageing, stress, diet, hormones or toxins. Common complex traits are under variable levels of genetic influence and additionally epigenetic effect. The detection of pathological epigenetic alterations will reveal additional insights into their aetiology and how possible environmental modulation of this mechanism may occur. Due to the reversibility of these marks, the potential for sequence-specific targeted therapeutics exists. This review surveys recent epigenomic advances and their current and prospective application to the study of common diseases

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More information

Published date: December 2010
Organisations: Biomedicine, Human Development & Health, MRC Life-Course Epidemiology Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400988
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400988
ISSN: 2041-2649
PURE UUID: 0ae41594-a7ff-467e-99bc-fa9499a7379e
ORCID for Christopher G. Bell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4601-1242

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2016 08:41
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:33

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