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Mass assembly and morphological transformations since z~3 from CANDELS

Mass assembly and morphological transformations since z~3 from CANDELS
Mass assembly and morphological transformations since z~3 from CANDELS
We quantify the evolution of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies as a function of morphology from z ~ 3 to the present. Our sample consists of ~ 50000 galaxies in the CANDELS fields (~880 arcmin2), which we divide into four main morphological types, i.e. pure bulge-dominated systems, pure spiral disc-dominated, intermediate two-component bulge+disc systems and irregular disturbed galaxies. Our main results are:
1) Star-formation: At z ~ 2, 80% of the stellar mass density of star-forming galaxies is in irregular systems. However, by z ~ 0.5, irregular objects only dominate at stellar masses below 109 Msun. A majority of the star-forming irregulars present at z ~ 2 undergo a gradual transformation from disturbed to normal spiral disc morphologies by z ~ 1 without significant interruption to their star formation. Rejuvenation after a quenching event does not seem to be common except perhaps for the most massive objects, because the fraction of bulge-dominated star-forming galaxies with M*/Msun > 1010.7 reaches 40% at z < 1.
2) Quenching: We confirm that galaxies reaching a stellar mass of M* ~ 1010.8 Msun (M*) tend to quench. Also, quenching implies the presence of a bulge: the abundance of massive red discs is negligible at all redshifts over 2 dex in stellar mass. However, the dominant quenching mechanism evolves. At z > 2, the SMF of quiescent galaxies above M* is dominated by compact spheroids. Quenching at this early epoch destroys the disc and produces a compact remnant unless the star-forming progenitors at even higher redshifts are significantly more dense. At 1 < z < 2, the majority of newly quenched galaxies are discs with a significant central bulge. This suggests that mass quenching at this epoch starts from the inner parts and preserves the disc. At z < 1, the high-mass end of the passive SMF is globally in place and the evolution mostly happens at stellar masses below 1010 Msun. These low-mass galaxies are compact, bulge-dominated systems, which were environmentally quenched: destruction of the disc through ram-pressure stripping is the likely process.
0035-8711
4495-4516
Huertas-Company, M.
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Bernardi, M.
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Perez-Gonzalez, P.G.
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Ashby, M.L.N.
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Barro, G.
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Conselice, C.
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Daddi, E.
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Dekel, A.
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Dimauro, P.
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Faber, S.M.
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Grogin, N.A.
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Kartaltepe, J.S.
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Kocevski, D.D.
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Koekemoer, A.M.
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Koo, D.C.
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Mei, S.
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Shankar, F.
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Huertas-Company, M.
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Bernardi, M.
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Perez-Gonzalez, P.G.
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Ashby, M.L.N.
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Barro, G.
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Conselice, C.
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Daddi, E.
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Dekel, A.
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Dimauro, P.
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Faber, S.M.
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Grogin, N.A.
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Kartaltepe, J.S.
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Kocevski, D.D.
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Koekemoer, A.M.
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Koo, D.C.
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Mei, S.
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Shankar, F.
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Huertas-Company, M., Bernardi, M., Perez-Gonzalez, P.G., Ashby, M.L.N., Barro, G., Conselice, C., Daddi, E., Dekel, A., Dimauro, P., Faber, S.M., Grogin, N.A., Kartaltepe, J.S., Kocevski, D.D., Koekemoer, A.M., Koo, D.C., Mei, S. and Shankar, F. (2016) Mass assembly and morphological transformations since z~3 from CANDELS. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 462 (4), 4495-4516. (doi:10.1093/mnras/stw1866).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We quantify the evolution of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies as a function of morphology from z ~ 3 to the present. Our sample consists of ~ 50000 galaxies in the CANDELS fields (~880 arcmin2), which we divide into four main morphological types, i.e. pure bulge-dominated systems, pure spiral disc-dominated, intermediate two-component bulge+disc systems and irregular disturbed galaxies. Our main results are:
1) Star-formation: At z ~ 2, 80% of the stellar mass density of star-forming galaxies is in irregular systems. However, by z ~ 0.5, irregular objects only dominate at stellar masses below 109 Msun. A majority of the star-forming irregulars present at z ~ 2 undergo a gradual transformation from disturbed to normal spiral disc morphologies by z ~ 1 without significant interruption to their star formation. Rejuvenation after a quenching event does not seem to be common except perhaps for the most massive objects, because the fraction of bulge-dominated star-forming galaxies with M*/Msun > 1010.7 reaches 40% at z < 1.
2) Quenching: We confirm that galaxies reaching a stellar mass of M* ~ 1010.8 Msun (M*) tend to quench. Also, quenching implies the presence of a bulge: the abundance of massive red discs is negligible at all redshifts over 2 dex in stellar mass. However, the dominant quenching mechanism evolves. At z > 2, the SMF of quiescent galaxies above M* is dominated by compact spheroids. Quenching at this early epoch destroys the disc and produces a compact remnant unless the star-forming progenitors at even higher redshifts are significantly more dense. At 1 < z < 2, the majority of newly quenched galaxies are discs with a significant central bulge. This suggests that mass quenching at this epoch starts from the inner parts and preserves the disc. At z < 1, the high-mass end of the passive SMF is globally in place and the evolution mostly happens at stellar masses below 1010 Msun. These low-mass galaxies are compact, bulge-dominated systems, which were environmentally quenched: destruction of the disc through ram-pressure stripping is the likely process.

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Accepted/In Press date: 22 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 July 2016
Published date: 11 November 2016
Organisations: Physics & Astronomy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401228
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401228
ISSN: 0035-8711
PURE UUID: dc4e34e9-3657-449a-939b-369f2ddcedea

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2016 14:47
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 17:13

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Contributors

Author: M. Huertas-Company
Author: M. Bernardi
Author: P.G. Perez-Gonzalez
Author: M.L.N. Ashby
Author: G. Barro
Author: C. Conselice
Author: E. Daddi
Author: A. Dekel
Author: P. Dimauro
Author: S.M. Faber
Author: N.A. Grogin
Author: J.S. Kartaltepe
Author: D.D. Kocevski
Author: A.M. Koekemoer
Author: D.C. Koo
Author: S. Mei
Author: F. Shankar

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