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Insights in human epigenomic dynamics through comparative primate analysis

Insights in human epigenomic dynamics through comparative primate analysis
Insights in human epigenomic dynamics through comparative primate analysis
Epigenomic analysis gives a molecular insight into cell-specific genomic activity. It provides a detailed functional plan to dissect an organism, tissue by tissue. Therefore comparative epigenomics may increase understanding of human-acquired traits, by revealing regulatory changes in systems such as the neurological, musculoskeletal, and immunological.

Enhancer loci evolve fast by hijacking elements from other tissues or rewiring and amplifying existing units for human-specific function. Promoters by contrast often require a CpG dense genetic infrastructure. Specific interplay occurs between the two, but also a shared modality of function, with coordination from global chromatin-modifying enzymes. Changes in specific transcription factor binding sites also facilitate the local epigenetic state. In the case of CTCF, these may further influence 3-dimensional structure and interaction.

How these mechanistic units are modulated between tissue and species enables more comprehensive understanding of human processes and pathology. With this information, precise therapeutic targeting of these epigenetic modifications may become possible.
0888-7543
1-11
Bell, Christopher G.
44982df7-0746-4cdb-bed1-0bdfe68f1a64
Bell, Christopher G.
44982df7-0746-4cdb-bed1-0bdfe68f1a64

Bell, Christopher G. (2016) Insights in human epigenomic dynamics through comparative primate analysis. Genomics, 1-11. (doi:10.1016/j.ygeno.2016.09.003). (PMID:27702613)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Epigenomic analysis gives a molecular insight into cell-specific genomic activity. It provides a detailed functional plan to dissect an organism, tissue by tissue. Therefore comparative epigenomics may increase understanding of human-acquired traits, by revealing regulatory changes in systems such as the neurological, musculoskeletal, and immunological.

Enhancer loci evolve fast by hijacking elements from other tissues or rewiring and amplifying existing units for human-specific function. Promoters by contrast often require a CpG dense genetic infrastructure. Specific interplay occurs between the two, but also a shared modality of function, with coordination from global chromatin-modifying enzymes. Changes in specific transcription factor binding sites also facilitate the local epigenetic state. In the case of CTCF, these may further influence 3-dimensional structure and interaction.

How these mechanistic units are modulated between tissue and species enables more comprehensive understanding of human processes and pathology. With this information, precise therapeutic targeting of these epigenetic modifications may become possible.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 October 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health, Centre for Biological Sciences, MRC Life-Course Epidemiology Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401348
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401348
ISSN: 0888-7543
PURE UUID: 2999924e-04c5-4482-a461-3726ec2c313f
ORCID for Christopher G. Bell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4601-1242

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Oct 2016 10:26
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 05:40

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