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Robust affective priming effects in a conditional pronunciation task: evidence for the semantic representation of evaluative information

Robust affective priming effects in a conditional pronunciation task: evidence for the semantic representation of evaluative information
Robust affective priming effects in a conditional pronunciation task: evidence for the semantic representation of evaluative information
Based on the hypothesis that information about the valence of words is encoded in a semantic system, we predicted that the match between the valence of a prime and the valence of a target word will influence the pronunciation of the target only if and to the extent that pronunciation is semantically mediated. In line with this prediction, we found affective priming effects (faster pronunciation when prime and target had the same valence than when they had a different valence) only when participants were instructed to read words but not nonwords (Experiment 1) or words that were not names of occupations (Experiment 2). Priming was not significant when participants were asked to read white but not red words (Experiment 1) or words that did not have a frame around them (Experiment 2).
0269-9931
251-264
De Houwer, Jan
87f1c427-b67c-4296-868b-935c0557193e
Randell, Tom
229fcc1b-8a4d-4ecc-98b5-1004f95a0665
De Houwer, Jan
87f1c427-b67c-4296-868b-935c0557193e
Randell, Tom
229fcc1b-8a4d-4ecc-98b5-1004f95a0665

De Houwer, Jan and Randell, Tom (2004) Robust affective priming effects in a conditional pronunciation task: evidence for the semantic representation of evaluative information. Cognition and Emotion, 18 (2), 251-264. (doi:10.1080/02699930341000022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Based on the hypothesis that information about the valence of words is encoded in a semantic system, we predicted that the match between the valence of a prime and the valence of a target word will influence the pronunciation of the target only if and to the extent that pronunciation is semantically mediated. In line with this prediction, we found affective priming effects (faster pronunciation when prime and target had the same valence than when they had a different valence) only when participants were instructed to read words but not nonwords (Experiment 1) or words that were not names of occupations (Experiment 2). Priming was not significant when participants were asked to read white but not red words (Experiment 1) or words that did not have a frame around them (Experiment 2).

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Published date: February 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40148
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40148
ISSN: 0269-9931
PURE UUID: ff4b319f-e76e-4ace-ad53-5b4911e0600d

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Date deposited: 03 Jul 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:00

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