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Numerical simulation of an ultrasonic vibratory cavitation device

Numerical simulation of an ultrasonic vibratory cavitation device
Numerical simulation of an ultrasonic vibratory cavitation device
Cavitation erosion prediction is one of the most important tasks in the ship propeller design. While predominantly qualitative methods are used such as paint tests or high speed video image analyses, there have been efforts to quantify such risks especially in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

As an experimental quantitative method to assess erosion risk, the acoustic emission (AE) technique has been employed, for example, by Lloyds Register for more than a decade now to complement their borescopic cavitation observation at the ship scale. Boorsma and Fitzsimmons (2009) reported (see Fig. 1,) its correlation with borescope observed cavitation events appeared very positive and the location of cavitation impingement on the rudder (shown in the left image of Fig. 1) coincided with the estimated location by multiple synchronous measurements of AE at different locations. If it is possible to decipher how the AE connected with the pressure waves emitted from any given cavitation event, predicting the pressure waves we may be able to predict AE and eventually where and what intensity of cavitation events occur on any given propeller or ship structures. The transfer function can be useful for establishing quantitative correlations between CFD, full-scale trial data and with model test data.

As the first step in being able to model this process and gain greater understanding in links between acoustic signal and type/location of cavitation, an open source Computational Fluid Dynamics programme openFOAM (version. 3.0.1) has been used to simulate ultrasonic cavitation on a sonotrode and hence to predict cavitation phenomena and pressure impact loads on a test specimen under the ultrasonic horn. The aim of the work is to evaluate the physical realism required and the limitations of current cavitation models.
55-60
Kim, Byoung
6a0ffc7c-ca5d-440d-8a11-6d9eb9c1d4d7
Wilson, Philip A.
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Kim, Byoung
6a0ffc7c-ca5d-440d-8a11-6d9eb9c1d4d7
Wilson, Philip A.
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce

Kim, Byoung, Wilson, Philip A. and Turnock, Stephen (2016) Numerical simulation of an ultrasonic vibratory cavitation device. 19th Numerical Towing Tank Symposium (NUTTS'16), St. Pierre d'Oleron, France. 02 - 03 Oct 2016. pp. 55-60 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Cavitation erosion prediction is one of the most important tasks in the ship propeller design. While predominantly qualitative methods are used such as paint tests or high speed video image analyses, there have been efforts to quantify such risks especially in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

As an experimental quantitative method to assess erosion risk, the acoustic emission (AE) technique has been employed, for example, by Lloyds Register for more than a decade now to complement their borescopic cavitation observation at the ship scale. Boorsma and Fitzsimmons (2009) reported (see Fig. 1,) its correlation with borescope observed cavitation events appeared very positive and the location of cavitation impingement on the rudder (shown in the left image of Fig. 1) coincided with the estimated location by multiple synchronous measurements of AE at different locations. If it is possible to decipher how the AE connected with the pressure waves emitted from any given cavitation event, predicting the pressure waves we may be able to predict AE and eventually where and what intensity of cavitation events occur on any given propeller or ship structures. The transfer function can be useful for establishing quantitative correlations between CFD, full-scale trial data and with model test data.

As the first step in being able to model this process and gain greater understanding in links between acoustic signal and type/location of cavitation, an open source Computational Fluid Dynamics programme openFOAM (version. 3.0.1) has been used to simulate ultrasonic cavitation on a sonotrode and hence to predict cavitation phenomena and pressure impact loads on a test specimen under the ultrasonic horn. The aim of the work is to evaluate the physical realism required and the limitations of current cavitation models.

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BG_paper_for_NUTTS_2016_extended_abstract_final.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 September 2016
Published date: 29 September 2016
Venue - Dates: 19th Numerical Towing Tank Symposium (NUTTS'16), St. Pierre d'Oleron, France, 2016-10-02 - 2016-10-03
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401579
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401579
PURE UUID: 1a2ed142-1f35-4c9e-83d5-9f2db0769b73
ORCID for Byoung Kim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7410-8220
ORCID for Philip A. Wilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6939-682X
ORCID for Stephen Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Oct 2016 14:03
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:36

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