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A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital

A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital
A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital
Objective: Poor sleep quality impairs immune responses and pain tolerance, both key to recovery from acute illness. Hospitalised children and their co-sleeping parents also risk emotional lability and impaired coping skills when sleep-deprived. We aimed to study the experiences of children and parents during hospital admissions.

Design: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents within a week of their child's discharge. Questions explored parent and child sleep quality, factors contributing to this, perceived impact on day-time functioning and suggested improvements to ward sleep environment.

Setting: Southampton Children's Hospital, UK.

Patients: 17 co-sleeping parents of 16 children aged 3–12?years completed interviews. Children admitted for surgical procedures and those with established sleep disorders or nocturnal seizures were excluded.

Main outcome measures: Constant comparative methods identified themes within the data using a grounded theory approach.

Results: Parents reported that they, and to a lesser extent their children, experienced reduced sleep quality. Noise and light as well as ward schedules were identified as key factors disrupting sleep. Parents reported that lack of sleep caused difficulties with their own emotional regulation and that of their child, affecting daytime parent–child relationships. Furthermore, they reported a negative impact of sleep deprivation on decision-making about their child's medical care.

Conclusions Parents identified poor sleep in hospital as a significant additional burden to their child's hospital admission. Importantly, they identified potential improvements to the ward sleep environment. Intervention studies that target modifiable, child-centred alterations to night-time ward culture are recommended, focusing on measurable child and parental outcomes.
0003-9888
546-551
Stickland, Alice
83e43c7d-702e-4a8a-bc09-21259336cf72
Clayton, Esther
8dc1d583-2e8e-4e25-b177-72a503a75223
Sankey, Ruth
cda332fd-744f-449f-bec5-3c3a31a00e42
Hill, Catherine M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Stickland, Alice
83e43c7d-702e-4a8a-bc09-21259336cf72
Clayton, Esther
8dc1d583-2e8e-4e25-b177-72a503a75223
Sankey, Ruth
cda332fd-744f-449f-bec5-3c3a31a00e42
Hill, Catherine M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d

Stickland, Alice, Clayton, Esther, Sankey, Ruth and Hill, Catherine M. (2016) A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 101 (6), 546-551. (doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-309458).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Poor sleep quality impairs immune responses and pain tolerance, both key to recovery from acute illness. Hospitalised children and their co-sleeping parents also risk emotional lability and impaired coping skills when sleep-deprived. We aimed to study the experiences of children and parents during hospital admissions.

Design: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents within a week of their child's discharge. Questions explored parent and child sleep quality, factors contributing to this, perceived impact on day-time functioning and suggested improvements to ward sleep environment.

Setting: Southampton Children's Hospital, UK.

Patients: 17 co-sleeping parents of 16 children aged 3–12?years completed interviews. Children admitted for surgical procedures and those with established sleep disorders or nocturnal seizures were excluded.

Main outcome measures: Constant comparative methods identified themes within the data using a grounded theory approach.

Results: Parents reported that they, and to a lesser extent their children, experienced reduced sleep quality. Noise and light as well as ward schedules were identified as key factors disrupting sleep. Parents reported that lack of sleep caused difficulties with their own emotional regulation and that of their child, affecting daytime parent–child relationships. Furthermore, they reported a negative impact of sleep deprivation on decision-making about their child's medical care.

Conclusions Parents identified poor sleep in hospital as a significant additional burden to their child's hospital admission. Importantly, they identified potential improvements to the ward sleep environment. Intervention studies that target modifiable, child-centred alterations to night-time ward culture are recommended, focusing on measurable child and parental outcomes.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 March 2016
Published date: June 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401644
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401644
ISSN: 0003-9888
PURE UUID: e0dcce87-c6bb-4588-baab-bfa4faeaddfc
ORCID for Catherine M. Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-5904

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Oct 2016 08:49
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:51

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