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Rhythmic movement disorder in childhood: an integrative review

Rhythmic movement disorder in childhood: an integrative review
Rhythmic movement disorder in childhood: an integrative review
Rhythmic Movement Disorder consists of repetitive stereotypic movements, such as head banging or body rocking, that recur every second or so and may last from a few minutes to hours, usually prior to sleep onset. This review of childhood rhythmic movement disorder highlights the lack of systematic research into core aspects of the condition, relying heavily on small case series or case reports. Interpretation is further limited by almost universal failure to confirm the core the diagnostic criteria (C) of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (III), namely that the rhythmic movements should have clinical consequences. Nonetheless, a number of themes emerge. Rhythmic movement disorder is likely to start in infancy and have a developmental course with spontaneous resolution in early childhood in many cases. Factors associated with persistence are, however, unclear. Associations with ADHD and neurodevelopmental disorders are intriguing, require further study and may shed light on the underlying cause of the condition. There is a pressing need for a systematic approach to classify rhythmic movement disorder, to allow standardization of the much needed research into the underlying aetiology and treatment of this relatively neglected sleep disorder.
1087-0792
1-50
Gwyther, Amy R.M.
533d13db-db65-40a1-994b-8e49aaee2937
Walters, Arthur S.
18d1a3c7-eb1a-4a56-8b9f-b6ff5af98629
Hill, Catherine M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Gwyther, Amy R.M.
533d13db-db65-40a1-994b-8e49aaee2937
Walters, Arthur S.
18d1a3c7-eb1a-4a56-8b9f-b6ff5af98629
Hill, Catherine M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d

Gwyther, Amy R.M., Walters, Arthur S. and Hill, Catherine M. (2016) Rhythmic movement disorder in childhood: an integrative review. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 1-50. (doi:10.1016/j.smrv.2016.08.003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rhythmic Movement Disorder consists of repetitive stereotypic movements, such as head banging or body rocking, that recur every second or so and may last from a few minutes to hours, usually prior to sleep onset. This review of childhood rhythmic movement disorder highlights the lack of systematic research into core aspects of the condition, relying heavily on small case series or case reports. Interpretation is further limited by almost universal failure to confirm the core the diagnostic criteria (C) of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (III), namely that the rhythmic movements should have clinical consequences. Nonetheless, a number of themes emerge. Rhythmic movement disorder is likely to start in infancy and have a developmental course with spontaneous resolution in early childhood in many cases. Factors associated with persistence are, however, unclear. Associations with ADHD and neurodevelopmental disorders are intriguing, require further study and may shed light on the underlying cause of the condition. There is a pressing need for a systematic approach to classify rhythmic movement disorder, to allow standardization of the much needed research into the underlying aetiology and treatment of this relatively neglected sleep disorder.

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Accepted/In Press date: 18 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 August 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401661
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401661
ISSN: 1087-0792
PURE UUID: 8c7a4e21-49e2-4d76-b192-2f8abe051b90
ORCID for Catherine M. Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-5904

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Date deposited: 19 Oct 2016 09:33
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 06:22

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Contributors

Author: Amy R.M. Gwyther
Author: Arthur S. Walters

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