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Local government authority attitudes to road traffic CO2 emissions modelling: a British case study

Local government authority attitudes to road traffic CO2 emissions modelling: a British case study
Local government authority attitudes to road traffic CO2 emissions modelling: a British case study
Local government authorities (LGAs) play a key role in facilitating mitigation of road traffic CO2 emissions and must engage in emissions modelling to quantify the impact of transport interventions. Existing Emissions Model (EM) methodologies range from aggregate to disaggregate approaches, with more detail normally entailing more resources. However, it is not clear which approaches LGAs actually utilise. This article reports results of a survey designed to discover the level of detail considered practical by British LGAs (n = 34). Results show that resource scarcity is important, with particular importance attached to EM reusability and convenient input data sources. Most LGA EMs use traffic variable inputs (predominantly traffic flow and traffic average speed), with this approach being the best-fit for LGA resources. Link-by-link sources of data rated highly for convenience are road traffic models and urban traffic control systems.
1029-0354
45-63
Grote, Matt
f29566f9-42a7-498a-9671-8661a4287754
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Kemp, Simon
942b35c0-3584-4ca1-bf9e-5f07790d6e36
Grote, Matt
f29566f9-42a7-498a-9671-8661a4287754
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Kemp, Simon
942b35c0-3584-4ca1-bf9e-5f07790d6e36

Grote, Matt, Williams, Ian, Preston, John and Kemp, Simon (2017) Local government authority attitudes to road traffic CO2 emissions modelling: a British case study. Transportation Planning and Technology, 40 (1), 45-63. (doi:10.1080/03081060.2016.1238570).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Local government authorities (LGAs) play a key role in facilitating mitigation of road traffic CO2 emissions and must engage in emissions modelling to quantify the impact of transport interventions. Existing Emissions Model (EM) methodologies range from aggregate to disaggregate approaches, with more detail normally entailing more resources. However, it is not clear which approaches LGAs actually utilise. This article reports results of a survey designed to discover the level of detail considered practical by British LGAs (n = 34). Results show that resource scarcity is important, with particular importance attached to EM reusability and convenient input data sources. Most LGA EMs use traffic variable inputs (predominantly traffic flow and traffic average speed), with this approach being the best-fit for LGA resources. Link-by-link sources of data rated highly for convenience are road traffic models and urban traffic control systems.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 October 2016
Published date: 2017
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science, Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401676
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401676
ISSN: 1029-0354
PURE UUID: c6fa27fe-1d1d-4787-a567-168d80806c71
ORCID for Ian Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219
ORCID for John Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Oct 2016 12:22
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:52

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