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Assassin in chief: Obama's drone legacy

Assassin in chief: Obama's drone legacy
Assassin in chief: Obama's drone legacy
This chapter considers how Barack Obama came to adopt drone warfare as the centrepiece if his counterterrorism policy, and discusses the legacy it leaves for both his presidency and that of his successors. It does this through the examination of three distinct aspects of America’s drone campaign: first, the counterterrorism legacy left by two terms of unmanned warfare. Second, the broad infrastructural legacy, specifically the physical network of bases and the costs associated with their maintenance. Third, the legal architecture which underwrites the drone programme, deliberating the constitutional implications this has for the presidency going forward. The chapter concludes by arguing that in the short term Obama’s legacy is the establishment of an Executive dangerously empowered with the seductive ability to undertake lethal actions in a seemingly cost-free manner across the globe, whilst in the longer term his tenure has dramatically lowered the political, legal and moral threshold for the United States to employ autonomous weapons in the future.
131-149
Routledge
Fuller, Christopher
c382672a-11a3-4d2a-8aa4-8ba345c64cc2
Bentley, Michelle
Holland, Jack
Fuller, Christopher
c382672a-11a3-4d2a-8aa4-8ba345c64cc2
Bentley, Michelle
Holland, Jack

Fuller, Christopher (2017) Assassin in chief: Obama's drone legacy. In, Bentley, Michelle and Holland, Jack (eds.) The Obama Doctrine: A legacy of continuity in US foreign policy? (Routledge Studies in US Foreign Policy) Abingdon, GB. Routledge, pp. 131-149.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This chapter considers how Barack Obama came to adopt drone warfare as the centrepiece if his counterterrorism policy, and discusses the legacy it leaves for both his presidency and that of his successors. It does this through the examination of three distinct aspects of America’s drone campaign: first, the counterterrorism legacy left by two terms of unmanned warfare. Second, the broad infrastructural legacy, specifically the physical network of bases and the costs associated with their maintenance. Third, the legal architecture which underwrites the drone programme, deliberating the constitutional implications this has for the presidency going forward. The chapter concludes by arguing that in the short term Obama’s legacy is the establishment of an Executive dangerously empowered with the seductive ability to undertake lethal actions in a seemingly cost-free manner across the globe, whilst in the longer term his tenure has dramatically lowered the political, legal and moral threshold for the United States to employ autonomous weapons in the future.

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Published date: 2017
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401783
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401783
PURE UUID: 1884cf29-2156-40e8-96c6-3ff21c4e3a54

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Date deposited: 21 Oct 2016 12:51
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 05:27

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Contributors

Editor: Michelle Bentley
Editor: Jack Holland

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