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Autonomy is the key: from smart towards intelligent textiles

Autonomy is the key: from smart towards intelligent textiles
Autonomy is the key: from smart towards intelligent textiles
Electronic textiles become smart by embedding circuits and sensors which offer some passive or active capabilities. Smart textiles become intelligent due to their computational abilities allowing awareness of their environment, extract input data from it, and consequently demonstrate untaught behaviours. Intelligent systems require machine intelligence through artificial intelligence algorithms to complete these input data manipulations. However, producing intelligent electronic textiles is a current research challenge. Hypothesising their eventuality and ubiquity, challenges such as remote communication, power generation, data processing, security, and ethics arise. In what remains we focus on the ethical implications and approaches to risk mitigation.
678-681
Ojuroye, Olivia
64591246-b373-4bad-83d7-8db7d7195209
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Beeby, Steve
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Wilde, Adriana
37ee0dec-a07f-4177-b291-96037fe48e14
Ojuroye, Olivia
64591246-b373-4bad-83d7-8db7d7195209
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Beeby, Steve
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Wilde, Adriana
37ee0dec-a07f-4177-b291-96037fe48e14

Ojuroye, Olivia, Torah, Russel, Beeby, Steve and Wilde, Adriana (2016) Autonomy is the key: from smart towards intelligent textiles At Workshop on Autonomous Everyday Objects, Heidelberg, Germany. 12 - 16 Sep 2016. 4 pp, pp. 678-681. (doi:10.1145/2968219.2968558).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Electronic textiles become smart by embedding circuits and sensors which offer some passive or active capabilities. Smart textiles become intelligent due to their computational abilities allowing awareness of their environment, extract input data from it, and consequently demonstrate untaught behaviours. Intelligent systems require machine intelligence through artificial intelligence algorithms to complete these input data manipulations. However, producing intelligent electronic textiles is a current research challenge. Hypothesising their eventuality and ubiquity, challenges such as remote communication, power generation, data processing, security, and ethics arise. In what remains we focus on the ethical implications and approaches to risk mitigation.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 September 2016
Venue - Dates: Workshop on Autonomous Everyday Objects: Exploring Actuation in Ubiquitous Devices (within UBICOMP/ISWC 2016), Heidelberg, Germany, 2016-09-12 - 2016-09-16
Organisations: Web & Internet Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401836
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401836
PURE UUID: cd826bb9-f571-4a3b-8acc-bb396381e6b0
ORCID for Steve Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Oct 2016 13:50
Last modified: 21 Nov 2017 17:31

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Contributors

Author: Olivia Ojuroye
Author: Russel Torah
Author: Steve Beeby ORCID iD
Author: Adriana Wilde

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