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Importance of species interactions in moderating altered levels of reactive nitrogen

Importance of species interactions in moderating altered levels of reactive nitrogen
Importance of species interactions in moderating altered levels of reactive nitrogen
The amount of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen that is generated and emitted at a global scale has greatly increased since the pre-industrial period, disrupting the natural balance of the nitrogen cycle and causing adverse impacts on human health, biodiversity, ecosystem services, and climate change. Consequently, how altered nitrogen availability and/or supply affects natural systems has received a significant amount of attention, but investigators have tended to focus on detailing microbial processes and biogeochemical pathways or on summarizing effects observed at the very broadest ecosystem scale. The way in which the effects of changing nitrogen concentrations are expressed in the environment, however, is also dependent on natural communities, yet how species–environment interactions may alter, or be altered by, the effects of nitrogen forcing has received much less attention. In this chapter, consideration is given to how changes to the stocks and flows of nitrogen may affect individuals, species, and species–environment interactions that, in turn, may either exacerbate or buffer the wider ecosystem effects of nitrogen forcing.
nitrogen cycle, species–environment interactions, community structure, ecological succession, herbivory, competition, predation, marine
247-260
Oxford University Press
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Solan, Martin
Whiteley, Nia
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Solan, Martin
Whiteley, Nia

Solan, Martin (2016) Importance of species interactions in moderating altered levels of reactive nitrogen. In, Solan, Martin and Whiteley, Nia (eds.) Stressors in the Marine Environment: Physiological and ecological responses; societal implications. Oxford, GB. Oxford University Press, pp. 247-260. (doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718826.003.0014).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The amount of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen that is generated and emitted at a global scale has greatly increased since the pre-industrial period, disrupting the natural balance of the nitrogen cycle and causing adverse impacts on human health, biodiversity, ecosystem services, and climate change. Consequently, how altered nitrogen availability and/or supply affects natural systems has received a significant amount of attention, but investigators have tended to focus on detailing microbial processes and biogeochemical pathways or on summarizing effects observed at the very broadest ecosystem scale. The way in which the effects of changing nitrogen concentrations are expressed in the environment, however, is also dependent on natural communities, yet how species–environment interactions may alter, or be altered by, the effects of nitrogen forcing has received much less attention. In this chapter, consideration is given to how changes to the stocks and flows of nitrogen may affect individuals, species, and species–environment interactions that, in turn, may either exacerbate or buffer the wider ecosystem effects of nitrogen forcing.

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More information

Published date: 10 March 2016
Keywords: nitrogen cycle, species–environment interactions, community structure, ecological succession, herbivory, competition, predation, marine
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401908
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401908
PURE UUID: 1d308403-a114-4b0a-ba22-4abf629e1af5
ORCID for Martin Solan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-5574

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Oct 2016 13:27
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 03:42

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Contributors

Author: Martin Solan ORCID iD
Editor: Martin Solan
Editor: Nia Whiteley

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