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Sex differences in the etiology of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior: Results from two twin studies

Sex differences in the etiology of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior: Results from two twin studies
Sex differences in the etiology of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior: Results from two twin studies
Recent theory and results from twin and adoption studies of children and adolescents suggest greater genetic influence on aggressive as compared to nonaggressive antisocial behavior. In addition, quantitative or qualitative differences in the etiology of these behaviors in males and females have been indicated in the literature. The Child Behavior Checklist was completed by the parents of 1022 Swedish twin pairs aged 7–9 years and of 501 British twin pairs aged 8–16 years. Genetic factors influenced aggressive antisocial behavior to a far greater extent than nonaggressive antisocial behavior, which was also significantly influenced by the shared environment. There was a significant sex difference in the etiology of nonaggressive antisocial behavior. Bivariate analyses supported the conclusion that the etiologies of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior differ for males and females.
0009-3920
155-168
Eley, Thalia C.
d9e3a546-3c35-4207-b074-2ced31f91f94
Lichtenstein, Paul
1e1573e3-7442-4d1f-969f-17dc9b7edaa4
Stevenson, Jim
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1
Eley, Thalia C.
d9e3a546-3c35-4207-b074-2ced31f91f94
Lichtenstein, Paul
1e1573e3-7442-4d1f-969f-17dc9b7edaa4
Stevenson, Jim
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1

Eley, Thalia C., Lichtenstein, Paul and Stevenson, Jim (1999) Sex differences in the etiology of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior: Results from two twin studies. Child Development, 70 (1), 155-168. (doi:10.1111/1467-8624.00012).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent theory and results from twin and adoption studies of children and adolescents suggest greater genetic influence on aggressive as compared to nonaggressive antisocial behavior. In addition, quantitative or qualitative differences in the etiology of these behaviors in males and females have been indicated in the literature. The Child Behavior Checklist was completed by the parents of 1022 Swedish twin pairs aged 7–9 years and of 501 British twin pairs aged 8–16 years. Genetic factors influenced aggressive antisocial behavior to a far greater extent than nonaggressive antisocial behavior, which was also significantly influenced by the shared environment. There was a significant sex difference in the etiology of nonaggressive antisocial behavior. Bivariate analyses supported the conclusion that the etiologies of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior differ for males and females.

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Published date: 1999
Additional Information: Personality and Social Development

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40204
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40204
ISSN: 0009-3920
PURE UUID: 724feb0d-75c4-406e-ba4b-7b3cd6f5370e

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Date deposited: 18 Jul 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:00

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