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Management of acute renal colic in the UK: A questionnaire survey

Management of acute renal colic in the UK: A questionnaire survey
Management of acute renal colic in the UK: A questionnaire survey
Background There is great variation in the Accident and Emergency workload and location of Urology services in UK hospitals. This study investigated the relationship of the initial management of acute renal colic with the department workload plus local facilities including location of X-ray and urology services in UK Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments.
Methods A&E departments in each of the 11 UK Deanery regions were stratified based on departmental workload, namely <30,000 (small); 30,000 to 50,000 (medium); 50,000 to 80,000 (large) and >80,000 (very large) patients per year. One third of departments were selected in each group leading to a sample size of 106. A questionnaire was administered. Associations between categorical variables were investigated using the chi-squared test and when not valid, Fisher's Exact test was employed. Differences between groups in ordinal variables were investigated using the Mann-Whitney test.
Results All questionnaires were returned. Twenty-nine units (27.4%) did not perform any radiological investigation on renal colic patients. The number of radiological investigations that were available to departments was associated with workload (P = 0.003); with 57.1% of the small departments performing none and at least 82.8% of units in the other categories performing at least one. Of those departments with X-ray facilities in or adjacent to the department, 63% performed an intravenous urography (IVU) compared to 25% of those departments without (P = 0.026). Of those departments with on-site urology services, 86% performed at least one radiological investigation compared to 52% of units without such services (P = 0.001). Department workload was associated with the first choice analgesia (NSAIDs or parenteral opiates) (P = 0.011). Of the small departments, 64.3% used NSAIDs, 21.4% used parenteral opiates and 14.3% used neither. In comparison, NSAIDS were used by at least 87%, and opiates by at most 12.5% of units in each of the other three categories of department workload.
Conclusions Over a quarter of UK A&E departments did not perform any radiological investigations and some departments do not even offer renal colic patients any analgesia. Patient management was associated with departmental workload, location of X-ray and Urology services. National guidelines are needed to ensure optimum care for all patients.
1471-227X
1-7
Lasoye, Tunji A.
0832af09-4045-4202-813a-73557c61d7ba
Sedgwick, Philip M.
789742a9-b628-425e-8078-94d188f5ad58
Patel, Nilay
662d0ee2-cfc3-4d42-8366-cdddc42fa805
Skinner, Chas
2698b95e-9b0f-49d1-badc-a654bff5fad7
Nayeem, Nadeem
06d635f1-de4f-4bd5-a5ce-1738e6c07396
Lasoye, Tunji A.
0832af09-4045-4202-813a-73557c61d7ba
Sedgwick, Philip M.
789742a9-b628-425e-8078-94d188f5ad58
Patel, Nilay
662d0ee2-cfc3-4d42-8366-cdddc42fa805
Skinner, Chas
2698b95e-9b0f-49d1-badc-a654bff5fad7
Nayeem, Nadeem
06d635f1-de4f-4bd5-a5ce-1738e6c07396

Lasoye, Tunji A., Sedgwick, Philip M., Patel, Nilay, Skinner, Chas and Nayeem, Nadeem (2005) Management of acute renal colic in the UK: A questionnaire survey. BMC Emergency Medicine, 4 (5), 1-7. (doi:10.1186/1471-227X-4-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background There is great variation in the Accident and Emergency workload and location of Urology services in UK hospitals. This study investigated the relationship of the initial management of acute renal colic with the department workload plus local facilities including location of X-ray and urology services in UK Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments.
Methods A&E departments in each of the 11 UK Deanery regions were stratified based on departmental workload, namely <30,000 (small); 30,000 to 50,000 (medium); 50,000 to 80,000 (large) and >80,000 (very large) patients per year. One third of departments were selected in each group leading to a sample size of 106. A questionnaire was administered. Associations between categorical variables were investigated using the chi-squared test and when not valid, Fisher's Exact test was employed. Differences between groups in ordinal variables were investigated using the Mann-Whitney test.
Results All questionnaires were returned. Twenty-nine units (27.4%) did not perform any radiological investigation on renal colic patients. The number of radiological investigations that were available to departments was associated with workload (P = 0.003); with 57.1% of the small departments performing none and at least 82.8% of units in the other categories performing at least one. Of those departments with X-ray facilities in or adjacent to the department, 63% performed an intravenous urography (IVU) compared to 25% of those departments without (P = 0.026). Of those departments with on-site urology services, 86% performed at least one radiological investigation compared to 52% of units without such services (P = 0.001). Department workload was associated with the first choice analgesia (NSAIDs or parenteral opiates) (P = 0.011). Of the small departments, 64.3% used NSAIDs, 21.4% used parenteral opiates and 14.3% used neither. In comparison, NSAIDS were used by at least 87%, and opiates by at most 12.5% of units in each of the other three categories of department workload.
Conclusions Over a quarter of UK A&E departments did not perform any radiological investigations and some departments do not even offer renal colic patients any analgesia. Patient management was associated with departmental workload, location of X-ray and Urology services. National guidelines are needed to ensure optimum care for all patients.

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Published date: 2005

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Local EPrints ID: 40213
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40213
ISSN: 1471-227X
PURE UUID: 4ccbfe9e-363d-427f-a708-da0b1c036c97

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:00

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