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Retrieval selectivity in the processing of self-referent information: testing the boundaries of self-protection.

Record type: Article

The mnemic neglect model (formerly the inconsistency - negativity neglect model, Sedikides & Green, 2000) contends that people recall self-referent feedback more poorly than other-referent feedback when it carries negative implications for central self-aspects, because such feedback is perceived as threatening. We tested the prediction that participants manifest such mnemic neglect only when the central negative feedback is highly diagnostic of self-aspects (high in threat potential), not when it is low in diagnosticity (low in threat potential). Participants read negative and positive feedback behaviors that referred either to the self or another person and that were either high or low in diagnosticity. As predicted, mnemic neglect was evident only for central negative behaviors high in diagnosticity. This retrieval selectivity illustrates the strategic nature of self-protection.

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Citation

Green, Jeffrey and Sedikides, Constantine (2004) Retrieval selectivity in the processing of self-referent information: testing the boundaries of self-protection. Self and Identity, 3, (1), pp. 69-80.

More information

Published date: 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40229
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40229
ISSN: 1529-8868
PURE UUID: 2e7222cc-7b71-4b4c-9612-07c9eb7b6571

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:35

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Contributors

Author: Jeffrey Green

University divisions

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