What I don't recall can't hurt me: information negativity versus information inconsistency as determinants of memorial self-defense


Sedikides, Constantine and Green, Jeffrey D. (2004) What I don't recall can't hurt me: information negativity versus information inconsistency as determinants of memorial self-defense Social Cognition, 22, (1), pp. 4-29. (doi:10.1521/soco.22.1.4.30987).

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Description/Abstract

According to the mnemic neglect model, people are threatened by feedback that has unfavorable implications for their central self-aspects, and, as a result, they recall it poorly. What is the locus of such poor recall (i.e., mnemic neglect)? Experiment 1 examined the role of information inconsistency. If mnemic neglect is due to expectancy violation, then it will be observed for any referent (e.g., self, friend, glowingly-described other) controlling for expectancy positivity. Mnemic neglect was obtained for the self but not a friend or a glowingly-described other. Experiment 2 disentangled the roles of information inconsistency and information negativity. Participants with positive and those with negative self-concepts both manifested mnemic neglect. Negative, rather than inconsistent, feedback drives mnemic neglect.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1521/soco.22.1.4.30987
ISSNs: 0278-016X (print)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
ePrint ID: 40231
Date :
Date Event
2004Published
Date Deposited: 04 Jul 2006
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2017 21:53
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40231

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