The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Differential interferometry of QSO broad-line regions - I. Improving the reverberation mapping model fits and black hole mass estimates

Differential interferometry of QSO broad-line regions - I. Improving the reverberation mapping model fits and black hole mass estimates
Differential interferometry of QSO broad-line regions - I. Improving the reverberation mapping model fits and black hole mass estimates
Reverberation mapping (RM) estimates the size and kinematics of broad-line regions (BLR) in quasars and type I AGNs. It yields size–luminosity relation to make QSOs standard cosmological candles, and mass–luminosity relation to study the evolution of black holes and galaxies. The accuracy of these relations is limited by the unknown geometry of the BLR clouds distribution and velocities. We analyse the independent BLR structure constraints given by super-resolving differential interferometry. We developed a three-dimensional BLR model to compute all differential interferometry and RM signals. We extrapolate realistic noises from our successful observations of the QSO 3C 273 with AMBER on the VLTI. These signals and noises quantify the differential interferometry capacity to discriminate and measure BLR parameters including angular size, thickness, spatial distribution of clouds, local-to-global and radial-to-rotation velocity ratios, and finally central black hole mass and BLR distance. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo model-fit, of data simulated for various VLTI instruments, gives mass accuracies between 0.06 and 0.13?dex, to be compared to 0.44?dex for RM mass–luminosity fits. We evaluate the number of QSOs accessible to observe with current (AMBER), upcoming (GRAVITY) and possible (OASIS with new generation fringe trackers) VLTI instruments. With available technology, the VLTI could resolve more than 60 BLRs, with a luminosity range larger than four decades, sufficient for a good calibration of RM mass–luminosity laws, from an analysis of the variation of BLR parameters with luminosity.
0035-8711
2420-2436
Rakshit, S.
21f31c8c-6633-4af0-9642-533d50436da2
Petrov, R.G.
094b56b8-7a3a-46d8-a982-0317dacca270
Meilland, A.
5d699262-0f8a-4825-b1b1-ce73791e9603
Hoenig, S.F.
be0bb8bc-bdac-4442-8edc-f735834f3917
Rakshit, S.
21f31c8c-6633-4af0-9642-533d50436da2
Petrov, R.G.
094b56b8-7a3a-46d8-a982-0317dacca270
Meilland, A.
5d699262-0f8a-4825-b1b1-ce73791e9603
Hoenig, S.F.
be0bb8bc-bdac-4442-8edc-f735834f3917

Rakshit, S., Petrov, R.G., Meilland, A. and Hoenig, S.F. (2015) Differential interferometry of QSO broad-line regions - I. Improving the reverberation mapping model fits and black hole mass estimates. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 447 (3), 2420-2436. (doi:10.1093/mnras/stu2613).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reverberation mapping (RM) estimates the size and kinematics of broad-line regions (BLR) in quasars and type I AGNs. It yields size–luminosity relation to make QSOs standard cosmological candles, and mass–luminosity relation to study the evolution of black holes and galaxies. The accuracy of these relations is limited by the unknown geometry of the BLR clouds distribution and velocities. We analyse the independent BLR structure constraints given by super-resolving differential interferometry. We developed a three-dimensional BLR model to compute all differential interferometry and RM signals. We extrapolate realistic noises from our successful observations of the QSO 3C 273 with AMBER on the VLTI. These signals and noises quantify the differential interferometry capacity to discriminate and measure BLR parameters including angular size, thickness, spatial distribution of clouds, local-to-global and radial-to-rotation velocity ratios, and finally central black hole mass and BLR distance. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo model-fit, of data simulated for various VLTI instruments, gives mass accuracies between 0.06 and 0.13?dex, to be compared to 0.44?dex for RM mass–luminosity fits. We evaluate the number of QSOs accessible to observe with current (AMBER), upcoming (GRAVITY) and possible (OASIS with new generation fringe trackers) VLTI instruments. With available technology, the VLTI could resolve more than 60 BLRs, with a luminosity range larger than four decades, sufficient for a good calibration of RM mass–luminosity laws, from an analysis of the variation of BLR parameters with luminosity.

Text
__filestore.soton.ac.uk_users_skr1c15_mydocuments_eprints_ASTRO_Sebastian Hoenig_Differential interferometry of QSO broad line regions I.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 December 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 January 2015
Published date: 1 March 2015
Organisations: Astronomy Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 402387
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/402387
ISSN: 0035-8711
PURE UUID: 1c93acad-93ed-478a-94c1-733d5e806bc0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Nov 2016 11:26
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 17:14

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: S. Rakshit
Author: R.G. Petrov
Author: A. Meilland
Author: S.F. Hoenig

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×