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Mortality in the Hertfordshire Ageing Study: association with level and loss of hand grip strength in later life

Mortality in the Hertfordshire Ageing Study: association with level and loss of hand grip strength in later life
Mortality in the Hertfordshire Ageing Study: association with level and loss of hand grip strength in later life
Background

Weak hand grip strength in later life is a risk factor for disability, morbidity and mortality and is central to definitions of sarcopenia and frailty. It is unclear whether rate of change in grip strength adds to level of grip strength as a risk factor for poor ageing outcomes.

Methods

Study participants were 292 community-dwelling men and women whose grip strength was measured during the 1994/5 (average age 67) and 2003/5 (average age 76) phases of the Hertfordshire Ageing Study, UK. Individual rate of change in grip strength was estimated using a residual change method. Mortality was followed-up to 2011 (42 men and 21 women died).

Results

Average grip strengths in 2003/5 were 38.4kg (standard deviation [SD] 8.1) and 23.7kg (SD 6.6) for men and women respectively. Average annualised rates of change in grip strength (2003/5 minus 1994/5) were modest owing to a healthy-participant effect (men: -0.12kg/year SD 0.71; women: 0.08kg/year SD 0.54) but varied widely. Mortality risk varied according to level and rate of change in grip strength (p=0.03); death rates per 100 person years of follow-up were 6.7 (95%CI 4.6,9.6) among participants who lost grip over time and had low grip in 2003/5, in contrast with 0.8 (95%CI 0.1,5.8) among participants whose grip changed little over time and remained high in 2003/5.

Conclusions

Levels of grip strength in later life should be considered in conjunction with estimates of change in grip strength identified by repeat measurement over time. Normative data for longitudinal change in grip strength are required.
0002-0729
407-412
Syddall, Holly
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Westbury, Leo
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Dodds, Richard
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sayer, A.A.
f4c60d4a-ae9c-4633-890f-598a717a61d4
Syddall, Holly
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Westbury, Leo
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Dodds, Richard
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sayer, A.A.
f4c60d4a-ae9c-4633-890f-598a717a61d4

Syddall, Holly, Westbury, Leo, Dodds, Richard, Dennison, Elaine, Cooper, Cyrus and Sayer, A.A. (2017) Mortality in the Hertfordshire Ageing Study: association with level and loss of hand grip strength in later life. Age and Ageing, 46 (3), 407-412. (doi:10.1093/ageing/afw222).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Weak hand grip strength in later life is a risk factor for disability, morbidity and mortality and is central to definitions of sarcopenia and frailty. It is unclear whether rate of change in grip strength adds to level of grip strength as a risk factor for poor ageing outcomes.

Methods

Study participants were 292 community-dwelling men and women whose grip strength was measured during the 1994/5 (average age 67) and 2003/5 (average age 76) phases of the Hertfordshire Ageing Study, UK. Individual rate of change in grip strength was estimated using a residual change method. Mortality was followed-up to 2011 (42 men and 21 women died).

Results

Average grip strengths in 2003/5 were 38.4kg (standard deviation [SD] 8.1) and 23.7kg (SD 6.6) for men and women respectively. Average annualised rates of change in grip strength (2003/5 minus 1994/5) were modest owing to a healthy-participant effect (men: -0.12kg/year SD 0.71; women: 0.08kg/year SD 0.54) but varied widely. Mortality risk varied according to level and rate of change in grip strength (p=0.03); death rates per 100 person years of follow-up were 6.7 (95%CI 4.6,9.6) among participants who lost grip over time and had low grip in 2003/5, in contrast with 0.8 (95%CI 0.1,5.8) among participants whose grip changed little over time and remained high in 2003/5.

Conclusions

Levels of grip strength in later life should be considered in conjunction with estimates of change in grip strength identified by repeat measurement over time. Normative data for longitudinal change in grip strength are required.

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 November 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 December 2016
Published date: May 2017
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 402454
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/402454
ISSN: 0002-0729
PURE UUID: 8f6ed235-39b9-4d77-ae17-25d50f5cc925
ORCID for Holly Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Richard Dodds: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4968-7678
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 08 Nov 2016 16:23
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:51

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Contributors

Author: Holly Syddall ORCID iD
Author: Leo Westbury
Author: Richard Dodds ORCID iD
Author: Elaine Dennison ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: A.A. Sayer

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