The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Social trust, interpersonal trust and self-rated health in China: a multi-level study

Feng, Zhixin, Vlachantoni, Athina, Liu, Xiaoting and Jones, Kelvyn (2016) Social trust, interpersonal trust and self-rated health in China: a multi-level study International Journal for Equity in Health, 15, (180), pp. 1-11. (doi:10.1186/s12939-016-0469-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Trust is important for health at both the individual and societal level. Previous research using Western concepts of trust has shown that a high level of trust in society can positively affect individuals’ health; however, it has been found that the concepts and culture of trust in China are different from those in Western countries and research on the relationship between trust and health in China is scarce.

Method: The analyses use data from the national scale China General Social Survey (CGSS) on adults aged above 18 in 2005 and 2010. Two concepts of trust (“out-group” and “in-group” trust) are used to examine the relationship between trust and self-rated health in China. Multilevel logistical models are applied, examining the trust at the individual and societal level on individuals’ self-rated health.

Results: In terms of interpersonal trust, both “out-group” and “in-group” trust are positively associated with good health in 2005 and 2010. At the societal level, the relationships between the two concepts of trust and health are different. In 2005, higher “out-group” social trust (derived from trust in strangers) is associated with better health; however, higher “in-group” social trust (derived from trust in most people) is associated with poor health in 2010. The cross-level interactions show that lower educated individuals (no education or only primary level), rural residents and those on lower incomes are the most affected groups in societies with higher “out-group” social trust; whereas people with lower levels of educational attainment, a lower income, and those who think that most people can be trusted are the most affected groups in societies with higher “in-group” social trust.

Conclusion: High levels of interpersonal trust are of benefit to health. Higher “out-group” social trust is associated with better health; while higher “in-group” social trust is associated with poor health. Individuals with different levels of educational attainment are affected by trust differently.

Other abstract.docx - Other
Restricted to Registered users only
Download (15kB)
PDF art_10.1186_s12939-016-0469-7.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (668kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 October 2016
Published date: 8 November 2016
Organisations: Gerontology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 402557
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/402557
ISSN: 1475-9276
PURE UUID: cc89cda4-e616-46ee-919d-76f360129d79

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Nov 2016 14:45
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 17:50

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Zhixin Feng
Author: Xiaoting Liu
Author: Kelvyn Jones

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×