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Integrating estuarine, coastal and inner shelf sediment systems in a common conceptual framework as a basis for participatory shoreline management

Integrating estuarine, coastal and inner shelf sediment systems in a common conceptual framework as a basis for participatory shoreline management
Integrating estuarine, coastal and inner shelf sediment systems in a common conceptual framework as a basis for participatory shoreline management
Coastal and estuarine margins are home to an increasing proportion of the global human population and its activities. Within this context, landforms play a critical role in mediating the translation of erosion and flood risk to human receptors in environmental settings that are vulnerable to the likely impacts of climate change. Predicting how coastal and estuarine landforms will evolve in response to changes in sea level and wave climate is thus of considerable importance. This is naturally a modelling problem but previous efforts have often failed to translate generic principles into models that do justice to the place-specific interactions between contemporary processes, antecedent geology, sea level history, historical morphology, engineering interventions and, not least, broader societal concerns. Progress clearly requires better models but, as we argue here, more sophisticated conceptual frameworks are also needed. Accordingly, we outline a new Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping (CESM) approach that captures the configuration of estuarine, coastal and inner shelf landform complexes within a unifying framework that also explicitly resolves the multitude of human interventions that influence shoreline change. An illustrative application to the Suffolk coast of eastern England demonstrates the potential of CESM to encourage a more participatory approach to regional shoreline management and the application of scientific understanding to the challenge of living with human and climate change impacts at the coast
245-277
Springer Japan
French, J.R.
719d0ebe-b924-45fb-8a88-27fd5b038806
Burningham, H.
e9f10657-0186-4c81-94fc-8655223ca244
Thornhill, G. D.
e1fdee7d-db8c-4e77-b631-8519ec1beb0a
Nicholls, R.J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
French, J.R.
719d0ebe-b924-45fb-8a88-27fd5b038806
Burningham, H.
e9f10657-0186-4c81-94fc-8655223ca244
Thornhill, G. D.
e1fdee7d-db8c-4e77-b631-8519ec1beb0a
Nicholls, R.J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076

French, J.R., Burningham, H., Thornhill, G. D. and Nicholls, R.J. (2016) Integrating estuarine, coastal and inner shelf sediment systems in a common conceptual framework as a basis for participatory shoreline management. In, Geomorphology and Society. Tokyo, JP. Springer Japan, pp. 245-277. (Advances in Geographical and Environmental Sciences, , (doi:10.1007/978-4-431-56000-5_15)) , (doi:10.1007/978-4-431-56000-5_15).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Coastal and estuarine margins are home to an increasing proportion of the global human population and its activities. Within this context, landforms play a critical role in mediating the translation of erosion and flood risk to human receptors in environmental settings that are vulnerable to the likely impacts of climate change. Predicting how coastal and estuarine landforms will evolve in response to changes in sea level and wave climate is thus of considerable importance. This is naturally a modelling problem but previous efforts have often failed to translate generic principles into models that do justice to the place-specific interactions between contemporary processes, antecedent geology, sea level history, historical morphology, engineering interventions and, not least, broader societal concerns. Progress clearly requires better models but, as we argue here, more sophisticated conceptual frameworks are also needed. Accordingly, we outline a new Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping (CESM) approach that captures the configuration of estuarine, coastal and inner shelf landform complexes within a unifying framework that also explicitly resolves the multitude of human interventions that influence shoreline change. An illustrative application to the Suffolk coast of eastern England demonstrates the potential of CESM to encourage a more participatory approach to regional shoreline management and the application of scientific understanding to the challenge of living with human and climate change impacts at the coast

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e-pub ahead of print date: 18 June 2016
Organisations: Energy & Climate Change Group

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Local EPrints ID: 402558
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/402558
PURE UUID: ed8eda40-f6df-404c-9c3a-a1bf98b1aaf2
ORCID for R.J. Nicholls: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9715-1109

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Date deposited: 11 Nov 2016 14:49
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:44

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