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Gendered practice in the provincial law firm: pay, progression and parenthood

Gendered practice in the provincial law firm: pay, progression and parenthood
Gendered practice in the provincial law firm: pay, progression and parenthood
Over the last thirty years there has been a dramatic diversification of the legal services sector; a significant number of women have joined the workforce. Feminist theorists and legal scholars have sought to understand the 'feminisation' of the profession and the paradoxical processes of gender stratification and gender segmentation. Despite the volume of scholaship in this field, there is a lack of empirical data on gender, the body and professional service firms (PSFs). This thesis addresses this gap, offering insight into the 'provincial PSF' and introducing the non-elite legal services worker into existing debates within femnist geography regarding gender and the body at work. This qualitative study is the first of its kind, comprising forty in-depth interviews with male and female legal professionals employed in the local labour markets (LLMs) of Bristol and Guildford. Data analysis uncovers striking gendered difference in aspirations and attitudes regarding pay, place, career progression and parenthood. Using a range of methodological tools, an interdisciplinary appeoach aims to flesh out a new feminist 'politics of the body' which can be used by feminist geographers to examine interactive services work.
White, Jennifer
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White, Jennifer
b09fa598-b8d5-4e9e-ab3a-af6f7f64914b
Sunley, Peter
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Reimer, Suzanne
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White, Jennifer (2016) Gendered practice in the provincial law firm: pay, progression and parenthood. University of Southampton, School of Geography, Doctoral Thesis, 221pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Over the last thirty years there has been a dramatic diversification of the legal services sector; a significant number of women have joined the workforce. Feminist theorists and legal scholars have sought to understand the 'feminisation' of the profession and the paradoxical processes of gender stratification and gender segmentation. Despite the volume of scholaship in this field, there is a lack of empirical data on gender, the body and professional service firms (PSFs). This thesis addresses this gap, offering insight into the 'provincial PSF' and introducing the non-elite legal services worker into existing debates within femnist geography regarding gender and the body at work. This qualitative study is the first of its kind, comprising forty in-depth interviews with male and female legal professionals employed in the local labour markets (LLMs) of Bristol and Guildford. Data analysis uncovers striking gendered difference in aspirations and attitudes regarding pay, place, career progression and parenthood. Using a range of methodological tools, an interdisciplinary appeoach aims to flesh out a new feminist 'politics of the body' which can be used by feminist geographers to examine interactive services work.

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White, Jennifer - final copy PhD.pdf - Other
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More information

Published date: 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 402564
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/402564
PURE UUID: 8c895d86-d59d-4d70-8377-3de5e3cc3a59
ORCID for Suzanne Reimer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7325-4368

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Dec 2016 16:42
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:43

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