The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Remembrance of remembrance past.

Remembrance of remembrance past.
Remembrance of remembrance past.
Arnold and Lindsay (2002) found that individuals more often failed to remember they had previously recalled an item if that item had been cued in a qualitatively different way on two recall occasions: the “forgot?it?all?along” (FIA) effect. Experiment 1 was designed to determine if the FIA effect arises because participants incorrectly believe they have not been previously tested for an item, or because they incorrectly believe they have failed to recall the item when previously tested. Experiment 2 measured participants' confidence in their incorrect prior?recall judgements, and Experiment 3 tested participants' ability to “recover” their previous recollection when the prior?recall context was restored. Results indicated that participants usually believed they had not previously been cued for the items they failed to remember previously recalling; they were often confident in their incorrect judgements of prior non?remembering; and re?introducing the context of prior remembering sometimes enabled them to recapture their memories of previous recall.
0965-8211
533-549
Arnold, Michelle M.
201113ad-16ee-47e7-a526-e2171150d39d
Lindsay, D. Stephen
9c9a44b6-f958-4d24-a80e-881648357cd8
Arnold, Michelle M.
201113ad-16ee-47e7-a526-e2171150d39d
Lindsay, D. Stephen
9c9a44b6-f958-4d24-a80e-881648357cd8

Arnold, Michelle M. and Lindsay, D. Stephen (2005) Remembrance of remembrance past. Memory, 13 (5), 533-549. (doi:10.1080/09658210444000214).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Arnold and Lindsay (2002) found that individuals more often failed to remember they had previously recalled an item if that item had been cued in a qualitatively different way on two recall occasions: the “forgot?it?all?along” (FIA) effect. Experiment 1 was designed to determine if the FIA effect arises because participants incorrectly believe they have not been previously tested for an item, or because they incorrectly believe they have failed to recall the item when previously tested. Experiment 2 measured participants' confidence in their incorrect prior?recall judgements, and Experiment 3 tested participants' ability to “recover” their previous recollection when the prior?recall context was restored. Results indicated that participants usually believed they had not previously been cued for the items they failed to remember previously recalling; they were often confident in their incorrect judgements of prior non?remembering; and re?introducing the context of prior remembering sometimes enabled them to recapture their memories of previous recall.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40309
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40309
ISSN: 0965-8211
PURE UUID: 495ea0f3-2cfe-4787-836f-767d26312ba3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jul 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:00

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×