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Distributed optical fibre acoustic sensors – future applications in audio and acoustics engineering

Distributed optical fibre acoustic sensors – future applications in audio and acoustics engineering
Distributed optical fibre acoustic sensors – future applications in audio and acoustics engineering
First successful experiments with optical fibre acoustic sensors were performed in 1970s by Bucaro et al.1 and Cole et al.2. Those and later developments were primarily concerned with point sensors which are equivalent to single microphone or a microphone array with fixed number of microphone. Optical fibre acoustic sensors utilise pressure induced variations in the refractive index of the fibre and its geometrical deformation caused by flexural wave to measure acoustic disturbance3.
Single point optical fibre acoustic sensors are usually more expensive than microphones. However, if a large number of sensors is needed, distributed optical fibre sensors can offer a cost-effective alternative to microphone array due to the possibility of mapping the sound pressure level as a function of distance. Historically the oldest application of distributed optical fibre sensors (DOFS) were to measure the integrity of optical fibres along long telecom optical links. Just recently the focus has shifted towards distributed measurements of sound and vibration4.
This paper briefly reviews the optical fibre distributed acoustic sensor technology. First, we look into distributed sensing principles in more details and compare different methods. In the next section,we will discuss the principle of Phase Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (phi-OTDR) and Rayleigh backscattering, which is used in the system designed and built by Masoudi et al.5. We will discuss the limitations of the system from acoustics point of view. Then, we propose possible applications of such a system in acoustic measurements. In sections 4–6, the results of the preliminary experiment performed in a reverberation chamber are presented and discussed.
Institute of Acoustics
Golacki, Piotr
a65636e4-a266-41b1-b3b1-b9927b81cf86
Masoudi, Ali
8073fb9b-2e6c-46c9-89cf-cb8670d76dc0
Holland, Keith
90dd842b-e3c8-45bb-865e-3e7da77ec703
Newson, Trevor
6735857e-d947-45ec-8163-54ebb25daad7
Golacki, Piotr
a65636e4-a266-41b1-b3b1-b9927b81cf86
Masoudi, Ali
8073fb9b-2e6c-46c9-89cf-cb8670d76dc0
Holland, Keith
90dd842b-e3c8-45bb-865e-3e7da77ec703
Newson, Trevor
6735857e-d947-45ec-8163-54ebb25daad7

Golacki, Piotr, Masoudi, Ali and Holland, Keith et al. (2016) Distributed optical fibre acoustic sensors – future applications in audio and acoustics engineering. In Acoustics 2016, Kenilworth 5 - 6 September 2016 : Proceedings of the Institute of Acoustics. vol. 38 (2), Institute of Acoustics..

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

First successful experiments with optical fibre acoustic sensors were performed in 1970s by Bucaro et al.1 and Cole et al.2. Those and later developments were primarily concerned with point sensors which are equivalent to single microphone or a microphone array with fixed number of microphone. Optical fibre acoustic sensors utilise pressure induced variations in the refractive index of the fibre and its geometrical deformation caused by flexural wave to measure acoustic disturbance3.
Single point optical fibre acoustic sensors are usually more expensive than microphones. However, if a large number of sensors is needed, distributed optical fibre sensors can offer a cost-effective alternative to microphone array due to the possibility of mapping the sound pressure level as a function of distance. Historically the oldest application of distributed optical fibre sensors (DOFS) were to measure the integrity of optical fibres along long telecom optical links. Just recently the focus has shifted towards distributed measurements of sound and vibration4.
This paper briefly reviews the optical fibre distributed acoustic sensor technology. First, we look into distributed sensing principles in more details and compare different methods. In the next section,we will discuss the principle of Phase Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (phi-OTDR) and Rayleigh backscattering, which is used in the system designed and built by Masoudi et al.5. We will discuss the limitations of the system from acoustics point of view. Then, we propose possible applications of such a system in acoustic measurements. In sections 4–6, the results of the preliminary experiment performed in a reverberation chamber are presented and discussed.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 October 2016
Published date: 10 October 2016
Additional Information: Proceedings published on a USB stick, available from the IOA.
Venue - Dates: ACOUSTICS 2016, Kenilworth, United Kingdom, 2016-09-04 - 2016-09-07
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre, Inst. Sound & Vibration Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 403159
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/403159
PURE UUID: 2bfc68e5-fad5-4d17-b406-594b32f56d79
ORCID for Ali Masoudi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0001-6080
ORCID for Keith Holland: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7439-2375

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Nov 2016 10:26
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 03:19

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