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Haven't we met before? The effect of facial familiarity on repetition priming

Haven't we met before? The effect of facial familiarity on repetition priming
Haven't we met before? The effect of facial familiarity on repetition priming
Within the word recognition literature, word‐frequency and hence familiarity has been shown to affect the degree of repetition priming. The current paper reports two experiments which examine whether familiarity also affects the degree of repetition priming for faces. The results of Experiment 1 confirmed that familiarity did moderate the degree of priming in a face recognition task. Low familiarity faces were primed to a significantly greater degree than high familiarity faces in terms of accuracy, speed, and efficiency of processing. Experiment 2 replicated these results but additionally, demonstrated that familiarity moderates priming for name recognition as well as face recognition. These results can be accommodated within both a structural account of repetition priming (Burton, Bruce & Johnston, 1990) and an Episodic Memory account of repetition priming (see Roediger, 1990), and are discussed in terms of a common mechanism for priming, learning and the representation of familiarity.
0007-1269
79-94
Stevenage, S.V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Spreadbury, J.H.
a268ce9f-941e-465a-9a33-6cdcbb4958d9
Stevenage, S.V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Spreadbury, J.H.
a268ce9f-941e-465a-9a33-6cdcbb4958d9

Stevenage, S.V. and Spreadbury, J.H. (2006) Haven't we met before? The effect of facial familiarity on repetition priming. British Journal of Psychology, 97 (1), 79-94. (doi:10.1348/000712605X58583).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Within the word recognition literature, word‐frequency and hence familiarity has been shown to affect the degree of repetition priming. The current paper reports two experiments which examine whether familiarity also affects the degree of repetition priming for faces. The results of Experiment 1 confirmed that familiarity did moderate the degree of priming in a face recognition task. Low familiarity faces were primed to a significantly greater degree than high familiarity faces in terms of accuracy, speed, and efficiency of processing. Experiment 2 replicated these results but additionally, demonstrated that familiarity moderates priming for name recognition as well as face recognition. These results can be accommodated within both a structural account of repetition priming (Burton, Bruce & Johnston, 1990) and an Episodic Memory account of repetition priming (see Roediger, 1990), and are discussed in terms of a common mechanism for priming, learning and the representation of familiarity.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 July 2006
Published date: 2006

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40332
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40332
ISSN: 0007-1269
PURE UUID: 6209c7ee-2947-46d9-91e5-81fef19049bf
ORCID for S.V. Stevenage: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4155-2939

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jul 2006
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 02:45

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Contributors

Author: S.V. Stevenage ORCID iD
Author: J.H. Spreadbury

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