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A ratio model of perceived speed in the human visual system

A ratio model of perceived speed in the human visual system
A ratio model of perceived speed in the human visual system
The perceived speed of moving images changes over time. Prolonged viewing of a pattern (adaptation) leads to an exponential decrease in its perceived speed. Similarly, responses of neurones tuned to motion reduce exponentially over time. It is tempting to link these phenomena. However, under certain conditions, perceived speed increases after adaptation and the time course of these perceptual effects varies widely. We propose a model that comprises two temporally tuned mechanisms whose sensitivities reduce exponentially over time. Perceived speed is taken as the ratio of these filters' outputs. The model captures increases and decreases in perceived speed following adaptation and describes our data well with just four free parameters. Whilst the model captures perceptual time courses that vary widely, parameter estimates for the time constants of the underlying filters are in good agreement with estimates of the time course of adaptation of direction selective neurones in the mammalian visual system
motion, speed, adaptation, psychophysics, model, vision
1471-2954
2351-2356
Hammett, Stephen T.
3dce0fd8-a584-4f0a-bd1c-77a23366fe98
Champion, Rebecca A.
cc00ecfc-1961-41b2-90e4-c6876caa679e
Morland, Antony B.
e9f73423-1da6-4de8-93ac-82072f490944
Thompson, Peter G.
64939c51-c27a-4b07-8161-f9f9ec6cb410
Hammett, Stephen T.
3dce0fd8-a584-4f0a-bd1c-77a23366fe98
Champion, Rebecca A.
cc00ecfc-1961-41b2-90e4-c6876caa679e
Morland, Antony B.
e9f73423-1da6-4de8-93ac-82072f490944
Thompson, Peter G.
64939c51-c27a-4b07-8161-f9f9ec6cb410

Hammett, Stephen T., Champion, Rebecca A., Morland, Antony B. and Thompson, Peter G. (2005) A ratio model of perceived speed in the human visual system. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 272 (1579), 2351-2356. (doi:10.1098/rspb.2005.3239).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The perceived speed of moving images changes over time. Prolonged viewing of a pattern (adaptation) leads to an exponential decrease in its perceived speed. Similarly, responses of neurones tuned to motion reduce exponentially over time. It is tempting to link these phenomena. However, under certain conditions, perceived speed increases after adaptation and the time course of these perceptual effects varies widely. We propose a model that comprises two temporally tuned mechanisms whose sensitivities reduce exponentially over time. Perceived speed is taken as the ratio of these filters' outputs. The model captures increases and decreases in perceived speed following adaptation and describes our data well with just four free parameters. Whilst the model captures perceptual time courses that vary widely, parameter estimates for the time constants of the underlying filters are in good agreement with estimates of the time course of adaptation of direction selective neurones in the mammalian visual system

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More information

Published date: 22 November 2005
Keywords: motion, speed, adaptation, psychophysics, model, vision

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40358
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40358
ISSN: 1471-2954
PURE UUID: f43bb77d-b130-4e6f-9f03-c1923941d453

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jul 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:00

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