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Force feedback microelectromechanical microphones for high performance applications

Force feedback microelectromechanical microphones for high performance applications
Force feedback microelectromechanical microphones for high performance applications
Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) condenser microphones are widely used because of their low cost, small size, high sensitivity, and wide bandwidth. For certain specialist applications, however, they are still out-performed by the best conventional condenser microphones, which have greater bandwidth and dynamic range, but at higher cost and larger size. The sensitivity, and hence, signal-to-noise ratio of smaller MEMS microphones can be increased by using two perforated back-plates instead of one. The maximum amplitude is limited by membrane excursion, which leads to nonlinearity and, ultimately, failure. The use of force feedback holds the promise of avoiding these problems by holding the membrane at its equilibrium position while measuring the force required to do so. Previous attempts to accomplish this using a Sigma-Delta modulator have had only limited success in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, bandwidth and stability. Instead we propose to use an Electro-Mechanical Phase Locked Loop (EMPLL) to overcome these limitations. We will present lumped-parameter and Finite Element models of the performance of such a microphone, and discuss the challenges associated with its fabrication. [This work was supported by Roke Manor Research Limited.]
Boorman, Owain
c254a648-a5e3-43dd-b83f-0a354099da58
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Wright, Matthew
b7209187-993d-4f18-8003-9f41aaf88abf
Boorman, Owain
c254a648-a5e3-43dd-b83f-0a354099da58
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Wright, Matthew
b7209187-993d-4f18-8003-9f41aaf88abf

Boorman, Owain, Harris, Nicholas and Wright, Matthew (2016) Force feedback microelectromechanical microphones for high performance applications. 5th Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and Acoustical Society of Japan, United States. 28 Nov - 02 Dec 2016. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) condenser microphones are widely used because of their low cost, small size, high sensitivity, and wide bandwidth. For certain specialist applications, however, they are still out-performed by the best conventional condenser microphones, which have greater bandwidth and dynamic range, but at higher cost and larger size. The sensitivity, and hence, signal-to-noise ratio of smaller MEMS microphones can be increased by using two perforated back-plates instead of one. The maximum amplitude is limited by membrane excursion, which leads to nonlinearity and, ultimately, failure. The use of force feedback holds the promise of avoiding these problems by holding the membrane at its equilibrium position while measuring the force required to do so. Previous attempts to accomplish this using a Sigma-Delta modulator have had only limited success in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, bandwidth and stability. Instead we propose to use an Electro-Mechanical Phase Locked Loop (EMPLL) to overcome these limitations. We will present lumped-parameter and Finite Element models of the performance of such a microphone, and discuss the challenges associated with its fabrication. [This work was supported by Roke Manor Research Limited.]

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: October 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: November 2016
Venue - Dates: 5th Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and Acoustical Society of Japan, United States, 2016-11-28 - 2016-12-02
Organisations: Acoustics Group, Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 403859
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/403859
PURE UUID: ba50de29-0d04-402e-aa2c-df5212998f77
ORCID for Nicholas Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Dec 2016 13:54
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:08

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