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Single-cell pluripotency regulatory networks

Single-cell pluripotency regulatory networks
Single-cell pluripotency regulatory networks
Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are a popular model system for investigating development, tissue regeneration, and repair. Although much is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between self-renewal and lineage commitment in PSCs, the spatiotemporal integration of responsive signaling pathways with core transcriptional regulatory networks are complex and only partially understood. Moreover, measurements made on populations of cells reveal only average properties of the underlying regulatory networks, obscuring their fine detail. Here, we discuss the reconstruction of regulatory networks in individual cells using novel single-cell transcriptomics and proteomics, in order to expand our understanding of the molecular basis of pluripotency, including the role of cell–cell variability within PSC populations, and ways in which networks may be controlled in order to reliably manipulate cell behaviorior.
1615-9853
2303-2312
Stumpf, Patrick
dfdb286c-b321-46d3-8ba2-85b3b4a7f092
Ewing, Rob
022c5b04-da20-4e55-8088-44d0dc9935ae
Macarthur, Ben D.
2c0476e7-5d3e-4064-81bb-104e8e88bb6b
Stumpf, Patrick
dfdb286c-b321-46d3-8ba2-85b3b4a7f092
Ewing, Rob
022c5b04-da20-4e55-8088-44d0dc9935ae
Macarthur, Ben D.
2c0476e7-5d3e-4064-81bb-104e8e88bb6b

Stumpf, Patrick, Ewing, Rob and Macarthur, Ben D. (2016) Single-cell pluripotency regulatory networks. Proteomics, 16 (17), 2303-2312. (doi:10.1002/pmic.201500528).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are a popular model system for investigating development, tissue regeneration, and repair. Although much is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between self-renewal and lineage commitment in PSCs, the spatiotemporal integration of responsive signaling pathways with core transcriptional regulatory networks are complex and only partially understood. Moreover, measurements made on populations of cells reveal only average properties of the underlying regulatory networks, obscuring their fine detail. Here, we discuss the reconstruction of regulatory networks in individual cells using novel single-cell transcriptomics and proteomics, in order to expand our understanding of the molecular basis of pluripotency, including the role of cell–cell variability within PSC populations, and ways in which networks may be controlled in order to reliably manipulate cell behaviorior.

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Accepted/In Press date: 27 June 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 August 2016
Published date: September 2016
Organisations: Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, Biomedicine, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 403924
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/403924
ISSN: 1615-9853
PURE UUID: 4d6dd99b-374e-4c78-877b-353c28efb179
ORCID for Patrick Stumpf: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0862-0290
ORCID for Rob Ewing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6510-4001

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Dec 2016 11:25
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:04

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