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Biologically inspired force enhancement for maritime propulsion and maneuvering

Biologically inspired force enhancement for maritime propulsion and maneuvering
Biologically inspired force enhancement for maritime propulsion and maneuvering
The move to high performance applications greatly increases the demand to produce large instantaneous fluid forces for high-speed maneuvering and improved power efficiency for sustained propulsion. Animals achieve remarkable feats of maneuvering and efficiency by changing their body shape to generate unsteady fluid forces. Inspired by this, we have studied a range of immersed bodies which drastically change their shape to produce fluid forces. These include relatively simple shape-changes, such as quickly changing the angle of attack of a foil to induce emergency stops and the use of tandem flapping foils to generate three times the average propulsive force of a single flapping foil.They also include more unconventional shape-changes such as high-speed retracting foil sections to power roll and dive maneuvers and the use of soft robotics to rapidly shrink the frontal area of an ellipsoid to power 68% efficient fast-start maneuvers or even completely cancel the drag force with 91% quasi-propulsive efficiency. These systems have been investigated with analytics, experimental measurements and immersed-boundary numerical simulations.
401-414
Weymouth, Gabriel
b0c85fda-dfed-44da-8cc4-9e0cc88e2ca0
Bertram, Volker
c1520b0f-eb25-41e8-bac2-34ec36940bbf
Weymouth, Gabriel
b0c85fda-dfed-44da-8cc4-9e0cc88e2ca0
Bertram, Volker
c1520b0f-eb25-41e8-bac2-34ec36940bbf

Weymouth, Gabriel (2016) Biologically inspired force enhancement for maritime propulsion and maneuvering. Bertram, Volker (ed.) 10th Symposium on High-Performance Marine Vehicles: HIPER, Cortona, Italy. 16 - 18 Oct 2016. pp. 401-414 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The move to high performance applications greatly increases the demand to produce large instantaneous fluid forces for high-speed maneuvering and improved power efficiency for sustained propulsion. Animals achieve remarkable feats of maneuvering and efficiency by changing their body shape to generate unsteady fluid forces. Inspired by this, we have studied a range of immersed bodies which drastically change their shape to produce fluid forces. These include relatively simple shape-changes, such as quickly changing the angle of attack of a foil to induce emergency stops and the use of tandem flapping foils to generate three times the average propulsive force of a single flapping foil.They also include more unconventional shape-changes such as high-speed retracting foil sections to power roll and dive maneuvers and the use of soft robotics to rapidly shrink the frontal area of an ellipsoid to power 68% efficient fast-start maneuvers or even completely cancel the drag force with 91% quasi-propulsive efficiency. These systems have been investigated with analytics, experimental measurements and immersed-boundary numerical simulations.

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Weymouth2016_Hiper.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: October 2016
Venue - Dates: 10th Symposium on High-Performance Marine Vehicles: HIPER, Cortona, Italy, 2016-10-16 - 2016-10-18
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404185
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404185
PURE UUID: a12f522d-68f8-4c58-8cb7-8d0a15524f7a
ORCID for Gabriel Weymouth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5080-5016

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jan 2017 14:09
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 03:59

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Contributors

Editor: Volker Bertram

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