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Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China and its mortality: an analysis of driving factors

Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China and its mortality: an analysis of driving factors
Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China and its mortality: an analysis of driving factors
Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China is rising with increasing Chinese overseas investment and international travel. Identifying networks and drivers of this phenomenon as well as the contributors to high case-fatality rate is a growing public health concern to enable efficient response. From 2011–2015, 8653?P. falciparum cases leading to 98 deaths (11.3 per 1000 cases) were imported from 41 sub-Saharan countries into China, with most cases (91.3%) occurring in labour-related Chinese travellers. Four strongly connected groupings of origin African countries with destination Chinese provinces were identified, and the number of imported cases was significantly associated with the volume of air passengers to China (P?=?0.006), parasite prevalence in Africa (P?<?0.001), and the amount of official development assistance from China (P?<?0.001) with investment in resource extraction having the strongest relationship with parasite importation. Risk factors for deaths from imported cases were related to the capacity of malaria diagnosis and diverse socioeconomic factors. The spatial heterogeneity uncovered, principal drivers explored, and risk factors for mortality found in the rising rates of P. falciparum malaria importation to China can serve to refine malaria elimination strategies and the management of cases, and high risk groups and regions should be targeted.
1-9
Lai, Shengjie
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Wardrop, Nicola A.
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Huang, Zhuojie
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Bosco, Claudio
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Sun, Junling
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Bird, Tomas
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Wesolowski, Amy
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Zhou, Sheng
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Zhang, Qian
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Zheng, Canjun
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Li, Zhongjie
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Tatem, Andrew J.
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Yu, Hongjie
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Lai, Shengjie
b57a5fe8-cfb6-4fa7-b414-a98bb891b001
Wardrop, Nicola A.
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Huang, Zhuojie
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Bosco, Claudio
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Sun, Junling
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Bird, Tomas
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Wesolowski, Amy
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Zhou, Sheng
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Zhang, Qian
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Zheng, Canjun
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Li, Zhongjie
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Tatem, Andrew J.
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Yu, Hongjie
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Lai, Shengjie, Wardrop, Nicola A., Huang, Zhuojie, Bosco, Claudio, Sun, Junling, Bird, Tomas, Wesolowski, Amy, Zhou, Sheng, Zhang, Qian, Zheng, Canjun, Li, Zhongjie, Tatem, Andrew J. and Yu, Hongjie (2016) Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China and its mortality: an analysis of driving factors. Scientific Reports, 6 (39524), 1-9. (doi:10.1038/srep39524).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum malaria importation from Africa to China is rising with increasing Chinese overseas investment and international travel. Identifying networks and drivers of this phenomenon as well as the contributors to high case-fatality rate is a growing public health concern to enable efficient response. From 2011–2015, 8653?P. falciparum cases leading to 98 deaths (11.3 per 1000 cases) were imported from 41 sub-Saharan countries into China, with most cases (91.3%) occurring in labour-related Chinese travellers. Four strongly connected groupings of origin African countries with destination Chinese provinces were identified, and the number of imported cases was significantly associated with the volume of air passengers to China (P?=?0.006), parasite prevalence in Africa (P?<?0.001), and the amount of official development assistance from China (P?<?0.001) with investment in resource extraction having the strongest relationship with parasite importation. Risk factors for deaths from imported cases were related to the capacity of malaria diagnosis and diverse socioeconomic factors. The spatial heterogeneity uncovered, principal drivers explored, and risk factors for mortality found in the rising rates of P. falciparum malaria importation to China can serve to refine malaria elimination strategies and the management of cases, and high risk groups and regions should be targeted.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 November 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 December 2016
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation, WorldPop, Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404217
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404217
PURE UUID: a1bb9350-de78-413d-b3fd-c853ee3671c9
ORCID for Shengjie Lai: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9781-8148
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jan 2017 09:45
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:38

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Contributors

Author: Shengjie Lai ORCID iD
Author: Zhuojie Huang
Author: Claudio Bosco
Author: Junling Sun
Author: Tomas Bird
Author: Amy Wesolowski
Author: Sheng Zhou
Author: Qian Zhang
Author: Canjun Zheng
Author: Zhongjie Li
Author: Andrew J. Tatem ORCID iD
Author: Hongjie Yu

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