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Magnetically oriented bicelles with monoalkylphosphocholines: versatile membrane mimetics for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

Magnetically oriented bicelles with monoalkylphosphocholines: versatile membrane mimetics for nuclear magnetic resonance applications
Magnetically oriented bicelles with monoalkylphosphocholines: versatile membrane mimetics for nuclear magnetic resonance applications
Bicelles (bilayered micelles) are model membranes used in the study of peptide structure and membrane interactions. They are traditionally made of long- and short-chain phospholipids, usually dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (D14PC) and dihexanoyl-PC (D6PC). They are attractive membrane mimetics because their composition and planar surface are similar to the native membrane environment. In this work, to improve the solubilization of membrane proteins and allow their study in bicellar systems, D6PC was replaced by detergents from the monoalkylphosphocholine (MAPCHO) family, of which dodecylphosphocholine (12PC) is known for its ability to solubilize membrane proteins. More specifically 12PC, tetradecyl- (14PC), and hexadecyl-PC (16PC) have been employed. To verify the possibility of making bicelles with different hydrophobic thicknesses to better accommodate membrane proteins, D14PC was also replaced by phospholipids with different alkyl chain lengths: dilauroyl-PC (D12PC), dipalmitoyl-PC (D16PC), distearoyl-PC (D18PC), and diarachidoyl-PC (D20PC). Results obtained by 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at several lipid-to-detergent molar ratios (q) and temperatures indicate that these new MAPCHO bicelles can be formed under a variety of conditions. The quality of their alignment is similar to that of classical bicelles, and the low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactants and their miscibility with phospholipids are likely to be advantageous for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.
0743-7463
13244-13251
Beaugrand, Maïwenn
01de7840-d85e-4d5a-a556-45258a37acfc
Arnold, Alexandre A.
760787c0-5a18-42b8-843b-b72bac75f8e7
Juneau, Antoine
19f8e20f-4343-4999-889a-ff00ec60e79e
Gambaro, Aline Balieiro
fec91f4d-9f23-4b9c-8b9c-1ab627ea30d8
Warschawski, Dror E.
5683d0f3-a38f-418d-a440-d1464c986f55
Williamson, Philip T.F.
0b7715c6-b60e-4e95-a1b1-6afc8b9f372a
Marcotte, Isabelle
6908440c-f797-48ee-b109-cfa557552ff2
Beaugrand, Maïwenn
01de7840-d85e-4d5a-a556-45258a37acfc
Arnold, Alexandre A.
760787c0-5a18-42b8-843b-b72bac75f8e7
Juneau, Antoine
19f8e20f-4343-4999-889a-ff00ec60e79e
Gambaro, Aline Balieiro
fec91f4d-9f23-4b9c-8b9c-1ab627ea30d8
Warschawski, Dror E.
5683d0f3-a38f-418d-a440-d1464c986f55
Williamson, Philip T.F.
0b7715c6-b60e-4e95-a1b1-6afc8b9f372a
Marcotte, Isabelle
6908440c-f797-48ee-b109-cfa557552ff2

Beaugrand, Maïwenn, Arnold, Alexandre A., Juneau, Antoine, Gambaro, Aline Balieiro, Warschawski, Dror E., Williamson, Philip T.F. and Marcotte, Isabelle (2016) Magnetically oriented bicelles with monoalkylphosphocholines: versatile membrane mimetics for nuclear magnetic resonance applications. Langmuir, 32 (49), 13244-13251. (doi:10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b03099). (PMID:27951690)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bicelles (bilayered micelles) are model membranes used in the study of peptide structure and membrane interactions. They are traditionally made of long- and short-chain phospholipids, usually dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (D14PC) and dihexanoyl-PC (D6PC). They are attractive membrane mimetics because their composition and planar surface are similar to the native membrane environment. In this work, to improve the solubilization of membrane proteins and allow their study in bicellar systems, D6PC was replaced by detergents from the monoalkylphosphocholine (MAPCHO) family, of which dodecylphosphocholine (12PC) is known for its ability to solubilize membrane proteins. More specifically 12PC, tetradecyl- (14PC), and hexadecyl-PC (16PC) have been employed. To verify the possibility of making bicelles with different hydrophobic thicknesses to better accommodate membrane proteins, D14PC was also replaced by phospholipids with different alkyl chain lengths: dilauroyl-PC (D12PC), dipalmitoyl-PC (D16PC), distearoyl-PC (D18PC), and diarachidoyl-PC (D20PC). Results obtained by 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at several lipid-to-detergent molar ratios (q) and temperatures indicate that these new MAPCHO bicelles can be formed under a variety of conditions. The quality of their alignment is similar to that of classical bicelles, and the low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactants and their miscibility with phospholipids are likely to be advantageous for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

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Accepted/In Press date: 15 November 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 November 2016
Published date: 13 December 2016
Organisations: Molecular and Cellular

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404260
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404260
ISSN: 0743-7463
PURE UUID: d1a0746d-6039-4011-8e27-09243c2a31c6
ORCID for Philip T.F. Williamson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0231-8640

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Date deposited: 03 Jan 2017 11:37
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 06:27

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Contributors

Author: Maïwenn Beaugrand
Author: Alexandre A. Arnold
Author: Antoine Juneau
Author: Aline Balieiro Gambaro
Author: Dror E. Warschawski
Author: Isabelle Marcotte

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