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What’s the law got to do with it? Legislation regarding in-vehicle technology use and its impact on driver distraction

What’s the law got to do with it? Legislation regarding in-vehicle technology use and its impact on driver distraction
What’s the law got to do with it? Legislation regarding in-vehicle technology use and its impact on driver distraction
Legislation in the road transport domain aims to control safety on the roads. Despite this, a critical issue affecting road safety is that of driver distraction. Although poorly defined, distraction is a significant road safety issue which, in part, is caused by the prevalence of technology within vehicles. Legislation surrounding the use of in-vehicle technologies are explored in this paper from a socio-technical system perspective. This reveals the wider context of the road transport system operating under the current laws using an Accimap analysis. A distinction in the law between the use of hand-held mobile phones, a device that is typically banned for use by drivers worldwide, and the use of other technological devices that are covered by more general laws against ‘careless’ and/or ‘dangerous’ driving was found. Historically, individual drivers’ have been blamed for distraction, whereas the systems approach shows how current legislation may have created the conditions necessary for driver distraction.
0001-4575
1-14
Parnell, Katie
3f21709a-403b-40e1-844b-0c0a89063b7b
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Plant, Katherine
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Parnell, Katie
3f21709a-403b-40e1-844b-0c0a89063b7b
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Plant, Katherine
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78

Parnell, Katie, Stanton, Neville and Plant, Katherine (2017) What’s the law got to do with it? Legislation regarding in-vehicle technology use and its impact on driver distraction. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 100, 1-14. (doi:10.1016/j.aap.2016.12.015).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Legislation in the road transport domain aims to control safety on the roads. Despite this, a critical issue affecting road safety is that of driver distraction. Although poorly defined, distraction is a significant road safety issue which, in part, is caused by the prevalence of technology within vehicles. Legislation surrounding the use of in-vehicle technologies are explored in this paper from a socio-technical system perspective. This reveals the wider context of the road transport system operating under the current laws using an Accimap analysis. A distinction in the law between the use of hand-held mobile phones, a device that is typically banned for use by drivers worldwide, and the use of other technological devices that are covered by more general laws against ‘careless’ and/or ‘dangerous’ driving was found. Historically, individual drivers’ have been blamed for distraction, whereas the systems approach shows how current legislation may have created the conditions necessary for driver distraction.

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__soton.ac.uk_UDE_PersonalFiles_Users_mh6_mydocuments_TRG_WEB PAGES_Revised Manuscript - What’s the Law got to do with it .docx - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 January 2017
Published date: March 2017
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404664
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404664
ISSN: 0001-4575
PURE UUID: 02a03822-e231-4b40-a6c0-a83ef69e22ba
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279
ORCID for Katherine Plant: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4532-2818

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2017 14:45
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 05:03

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