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Putting knowledge into practice: does information on adverse drug interactions influence people's dosing behavior?

Putting knowledge into practice: does information on adverse drug interactions influence people's dosing behavior?
Putting knowledge into practice: does information on adverse drug interactions influence people's dosing behavior?
Objective: Adverse drug events relating to drug-drug interactions are a common cause of patient harm. Central to avoiding this harm is the patients’ understanding that certain drug combinations present a synergistic risk. Two studies tested whether providing individuals with information about a drug combination that presents a synergistic (cf. additive) risk would elicit higher perceived risk and, therefore, would result in greater precaution in terms of dosing behavior.

Design: Both studies employed an experimental design.

Methods: Participants were presented with a scenario describing how two symptoms of an infection could each be treated by a different drug. In Experiment 1, information about the effects of combining the two drugs was varied: (i) no information, (ii) combination elicits an additive risk, or (iii) combination elicits a synergistic risk. In Experiment 2, the size of the risk (small or large) and the participant’s role (patient or doctor) was also varied.

Results: In both experiments, perceived risk and negative affect increased in response to information about the increased probability of side effects from the drug-drug interaction. Despite these increases, participants did not adjust their drug dosing behavior in either experiment: dosing was similar when these interactions were large or small, or when they were due to synergistic or additive effects.

Conclusions: People may struggle to transfer their knowledge of drug-drug interaction risks into decision making behaviors. Care should be taken not to assume that holding accurate risk perceptions of a drugs side effect will result in decisions that help avoid adverse drug events.
1359-107X
330-344
Dohle, Simone
fa7225d8-1dd1-454f-8153-f3da8711191c
Dawson, Ian
dff1b440-6c83-4354-92b6-04809460b01a
Dohle, Simone
fa7225d8-1dd1-454f-8153-f3da8711191c
Dawson, Ian
dff1b440-6c83-4354-92b6-04809460b01a

Dohle, Simone and Dawson, Ian (2017) Putting knowledge into practice: does information on adverse drug interactions influence people's dosing behavior? British Journal of Health Psychology, 22 (2), 330-344. (doi:10.1111/bjhp.12231).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Adverse drug events relating to drug-drug interactions are a common cause of patient harm. Central to avoiding this harm is the patients’ understanding that certain drug combinations present a synergistic risk. Two studies tested whether providing individuals with information about a drug combination that presents a synergistic (cf. additive) risk would elicit higher perceived risk and, therefore, would result in greater precaution in terms of dosing behavior.

Design: Both studies employed an experimental design.

Methods: Participants were presented with a scenario describing how two symptoms of an infection could each be treated by a different drug. In Experiment 1, information about the effects of combining the two drugs was varied: (i) no information, (ii) combination elicits an additive risk, or (iii) combination elicits a synergistic risk. In Experiment 2, the size of the risk (small or large) and the participant’s role (patient or doctor) was also varied.

Results: In both experiments, perceived risk and negative affect increased in response to information about the increased probability of side effects from the drug-drug interaction. Despite these increases, participants did not adjust their drug dosing behavior in either experiment: dosing was similar when these interactions were large or small, or when they were due to synergistic or additive effects.

Conclusions: People may struggle to transfer their knowledge of drug-drug interaction risks into decision making behaviors. Care should be taken not to assume that holding accurate risk perceptions of a drugs side effect will result in decisions that help avoid adverse drug events.

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Putting Knowledge into Practice - Pre-Acceptance Version.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 January 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 February 2017
Published date: May 2017
Organisations: Centre of Excellence in Decision, Analytics & Risk Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404675
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404675
ISSN: 1359-107X
PURE UUID: 5965e073-12ed-46bd-a7ce-3e5ad164362a
ORCID for Ian Dawson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0555-9682

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Date deposited: 19 Jan 2017 15:31
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 04:42

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Contributors

Author: Simone Dohle
Author: Ian Dawson ORCID iD

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