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Hot topics in reactive oxygen therapy: antimicrobial and immunological mechanisms, safety, and clinical applications

Hot topics in reactive oxygen therapy: antimicrobial and immunological mechanisms, safety, and clinical applications
Hot topics in reactive oxygen therapy: antimicrobial and immunological mechanisms, safety, and clinical applications
Reactive oxygen species (ROS), when combined with various delivery mechanisms, has the potential to become a powerful novel therapeutic agent against difficult-to-treat infections, especially those involving biofilm. It is important in the context of the global antibiotic resistance crisis. ROS is rapidly active in vitro against all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. ROS also has antifungal and antiviral properties. ROS prevents the formation of biofilms caused by a range of bacterial species in wounds and respiratory epithelium. ROS has been successfully used in infection prevention, eradication of multiresistant organisms, prevention of surgical site infection, and intravascular line care. This antimicrobial mechanism has great potential for the control of bioburden and biofilm at many sites, thus providing an alternative to systemic antibiotics on epithelial/mucosal surfaces, for wound and cavity infection, chronic respiratory infections and possibly recurrent urinary infections as well as local delivery to deeper structures and prosthetic devices. Its simplicity and stability lend itself to use in developing economies as well.
2213-7165
194-198
Dryden, Matthew
a6c300f9-5c26-4884-980b-c098b0688ab1
Cooke, Jonathan
66a01b74-cc14-4831-a7cb-231e692e8a70
Salib, Rami
d6fde1c1-5b5e-43f7-ae1c-42cce6a0c9fc
Holding, Rebecca
26ba12d5-b26d-46bc-9844-f37970e9cf06
Pender, Sylvia
62528b03-ec42-41bb-80fe-48454c2c5242
Brooks, Jill
42ca6c8a-0a65-459a-a5f2-8de50551ed3b
Dryden, Matthew
a6c300f9-5c26-4884-980b-c098b0688ab1
Cooke, Jonathan
66a01b74-cc14-4831-a7cb-231e692e8a70
Salib, Rami
d6fde1c1-5b5e-43f7-ae1c-42cce6a0c9fc
Holding, Rebecca
26ba12d5-b26d-46bc-9844-f37970e9cf06
Pender, Sylvia
62528b03-ec42-41bb-80fe-48454c2c5242
Brooks, Jill
42ca6c8a-0a65-459a-a5f2-8de50551ed3b

Dryden, Matthew, Cooke, Jonathan, Salib, Rami, Holding, Rebecca, Pender, Sylvia and Brooks, Jill (2017) Hot topics in reactive oxygen therapy: antimicrobial and immunological mechanisms, safety, and clinical applications. Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, 8, 194-198. (doi:10.1016/j.jgar.2016.12.012).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), when combined with various delivery mechanisms, has the potential to become a powerful novel therapeutic agent against difficult-to-treat infections, especially those involving biofilm. It is important in the context of the global antibiotic resistance crisis. ROS is rapidly active in vitro against all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. ROS also has antifungal and antiviral properties. ROS prevents the formation of biofilms caused by a range of bacterial species in wounds and respiratory epithelium. ROS has been successfully used in infection prevention, eradication of multiresistant organisms, prevention of surgical site infection, and intravascular line care. This antimicrobial mechanism has great potential for the control of bioburden and biofilm at many sites, thus providing an alternative to systemic antibiotics on epithelial/mucosal surfaces, for wound and cavity infection, chronic respiratory infections and possibly recurrent urinary infections as well as local delivery to deeper structures and prosthetic devices. Its simplicity and stability lend itself to use in developing economies as well.

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Pender -- Surgihoney 2017-02 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 13 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 February 2017
Published date: March 2017
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404688
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404688
ISSN: 2213-7165
PURE UUID: c8f03138-4876-48fc-9d8d-291bf88005af
ORCID for Rami Salib: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6753-7844
ORCID for Sylvia Pender: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-0333

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2017 16:28
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 06:22

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Contributors

Author: Matthew Dryden
Author: Jonathan Cooke
Author: Rami Salib ORCID iD
Author: Rebecca Holding
Author: Sylvia Pender ORCID iD
Author: Jill Brooks

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