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Control of light via individual resonant nanoparticle devices

Control of light via individual resonant nanoparticle devices
Control of light via individual resonant nanoparticle devices
This thesis investigates the control of light via isolated nanoparticles of gold or III-V semiconductor gallium phosphide. Nanoscale control of light has a range applications in on-chip devices and optoelectric interfacing, where large arrays of nanoparticles are not always practical.

Simulations, performed using the Boundary Element Method, show semiconductor nanorods to function as two-dimensional cavities, bridging the gap between more commonly used analytical models for a sphere and an infinite cylinder. Dimer structures, made of two nanorods placed end-to-end, are shown to enhance the electric field in the center of the gap, comparable to gold structures of similar design. Experiments, however, show these effects to be elusive. Further simulation using the Finite Element Method indicates that these structures also demonstrate highly directional reradiation of the incident field.

Gold nanoantennas were investigated for their interaction with a phase change material and light carried within a wavguide with the aim of producing an all-optical modulation device. A film of phase change material is shown to be able to rapidly and reversibly modulate the response of a gold nanoantenna. An antenna on top of a rib waveguide is shown to aid in the modulation of a carrier pulse by use of a second pump pulse.
Traviss, Daniel James
eb9f6403-d646-42a6-8653-44f4147fd47b
Traviss, Daniel James
eb9f6403-d646-42a6-8653-44f4147fd47b
Muskens, Otto
2284101a-f9ef-4d79-8951-a6cda5bfc7f9

(2016) Control of light via individual resonant nanoparticle devices. University of Southampton, Faculty of Physical Science and Engineering, Doctoral Thesis, 135pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis investigates the control of light via isolated nanoparticles of gold or III-V semiconductor gallium phosphide. Nanoscale control of light has a range applications in on-chip devices and optoelectric interfacing, where large arrays of nanoparticles are not always practical.

Simulations, performed using the Boundary Element Method, show semiconductor nanorods to function as two-dimensional cavities, bridging the gap between more commonly used analytical models for a sphere and an infinite cylinder. Dimer structures, made of two nanorods placed end-to-end, are shown to enhance the electric field in the center of the gap, comparable to gold structures of similar design. Experiments, however, show these effects to be elusive. Further simulation using the Finite Element Method indicates that these structures also demonstrate highly directional reradiation of the incident field.

Gold nanoantennas were investigated for their interaction with a phase change material and light carried within a wavguide with the aim of producing an all-optical modulation device. A film of phase change material is shown to be able to rapidly and reversibly modulate the response of a gold nanoantenna. An antenna on top of a rib waveguide is shown to aid in the modulation of a carrier pulse by use of a second pump pulse.

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More information

Published date: November 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Quantum, Light & Matter Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404691
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404691
PURE UUID: 16121476-bf77-455c-9b5a-849721b6dc6c
ORCID for Otto Muskens: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0693-5504

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2017 16:09
Last modified: 19 Jun 2018 00:32

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