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Drugs for alcohol dependence

Drugs for alcohol dependence
Drugs for alcohol dependence
There is good evidence for the use of pharmacological treatments to improve outcomes in patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD). The management of acute withdrawal should include a high risk of suspicion for Wernicke–Korsakoff Syndrome, necessitating treatment with parenteral high-potency B vitamins (Pabrinex®). Benzodiazepines in reducing doses should be used in conjunction with a continuing treatment plan after detox (detox). The relapse prevention medications acamprosate and naltrexone should be considered in all patients with moderate to severe alcohol dependence wishing to maintain abstinence. Disulfiram can be considered as a second-line treatment, but should be initiated by a specialist. Nalmefene has been shown to be effective in patients with mild dependence wishing to reduce their alcohol consumption. Baclofen has a temporary indication in France, and may have a role in patients with co-morbid liver disease and anxiety, but its efficacy remains unproven.
1357-3039
761-763
Sinclair, Julia
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Sinclair, Julia
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c

Sinclair, Julia (2016) Drugs for alcohol dependence. [in special issue: Psychiatry Part 2 of 2] Medicine, 44 (12), 761-763. (doi:10.1016/j.mpmed.2016.09.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is good evidence for the use of pharmacological treatments to improve outcomes in patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD). The management of acute withdrawal should include a high risk of suspicion for Wernicke–Korsakoff Syndrome, necessitating treatment with parenteral high-potency B vitamins (Pabrinex®). Benzodiazepines in reducing doses should be used in conjunction with a continuing treatment plan after detox (detox). The relapse prevention medications acamprosate and naltrexone should be considered in all patients with moderate to severe alcohol dependence wishing to maintain abstinence. Disulfiram can be considered as a second-line treatment, but should be initiated by a specialist. Nalmefene has been shown to be effective in patients with mild dependence wishing to reduce their alcohol consumption. Baclofen has a temporary indication in France, and may have a role in patients with co-morbid liver disease and anxiety, but its efficacy remains unproven.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 26 October 2016
Published date: December 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404698
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404698
ISSN: 1357-3039
PURE UUID: c59d35fd-4b19-4fbf-b07a-4cc2c05c5efa
ORCID for Julia Sinclair: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1905-2025

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Date deposited: 20 Jan 2017 14:00
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 05:28

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