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Seasonal effects to metallothionein responses to metal exposure in a naturalised population of Ruditapes philippinarum in a semi-enclosed estuarine environment

Seasonal effects to metallothionein responses to metal exposure in a naturalised population of Ruditapes philippinarum in a semi-enclosed estuarine environment
Seasonal effects to metallothionein responses to metal exposure in a naturalised population of Ruditapes philippinarum in a semi-enclosed estuarine environment
The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), an invasive species in Northern Europe, can be used as a bioindicator of metal pollution. Seasonal effects on metallothionein (MT) production have not been considered in this species at the northernmost extent of its European distribution. This study assesses the annual seasonal effects on MT and metal concentrations in R. philippinarum from Poole Harbour, UK. R. philippinarum were collected in winter, spring, summer, and autumn throughout 2015, and MT and metal concentrations, as well as biotic and abiotic variables, were quantified. During winter, linear regression analysis showed significant positive relationships between tissue metal and MT concentrations. However, during spring and summer, these relationships were mostly insignificant. MT concentrations during spring had significant positive relationships with tissue and whole weight. Significant positive relationships were also observed between MT and condition index, during summer. During spring and summer, biotic factors seem to override the role of MT as a detoxification mechanism for metal exposure in this species. This is probably due to an increase in MT concentration in spring caused by gametogenesis, associated with increased tissue weight as the gonads expand. A depletion of energy resources, or physical stressors such as heat, may be attributed to the reduced MT production in clams of poor body condition in summer. The evidence from this study suggests that MT may only be a useful biomarker of metal pollution during winter in R. philippinarum in the UK. This verifies the natural variability of MT in this species at high latitudes, and highlights the potential and limits to a widely available bioindicator of metal pollution.
Biomonitoring, Manila clam, Poole Harbour, Gametogenesis, Condition index, Invasive species
0048-9697
1279-1290
Hudson, Malcolm
1ae18506-6f2a-48af-8c72-83ab28679f55
Oaten, James, Francis Price
523dd2e9-6fbd-4bc0-bcb9-72a1627926b5
Jensen, A.C.
ff1cabd2-e6fa-4e34-9a39-5097e2bc5f85
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Hudson, Malcolm
1ae18506-6f2a-48af-8c72-83ab28679f55
Oaten, James, Francis Price
523dd2e9-6fbd-4bc0-bcb9-72a1627926b5
Jensen, A.C.
ff1cabd2-e6fa-4e34-9a39-5097e2bc5f85
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Hudson, Malcolm, Oaten, James, Francis Price, Jensen, A.C. and Williams, Ian (2017) Seasonal effects to metallothionein responses to metal exposure in a naturalised population of Ruditapes philippinarum in a semi-enclosed estuarine environment. Science of the Total Environment, 575, 1279-1290. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.09.202).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), an invasive species in Northern Europe, can be used as a bioindicator of metal pollution. Seasonal effects on metallothionein (MT) production have not been considered in this species at the northernmost extent of its European distribution. This study assesses the annual seasonal effects on MT and metal concentrations in R. philippinarum from Poole Harbour, UK. R. philippinarum were collected in winter, spring, summer, and autumn throughout 2015, and MT and metal concentrations, as well as biotic and abiotic variables, were quantified. During winter, linear regression analysis showed significant positive relationships between tissue metal and MT concentrations. However, during spring and summer, these relationships were mostly insignificant. MT concentrations during spring had significant positive relationships with tissue and whole weight. Significant positive relationships were also observed between MT and condition index, during summer. During spring and summer, biotic factors seem to override the role of MT as a detoxification mechanism for metal exposure in this species. This is probably due to an increase in MT concentration in spring caused by gametogenesis, associated with increased tissue weight as the gonads expand. A depletion of energy resources, or physical stressors such as heat, may be attributed to the reduced MT production in clams of poor body condition in summer. The evidence from this study suggests that MT may only be a useful biomarker of metal pollution during winter in R. philippinarum in the UK. This verifies the natural variability of MT in this species at high latitudes, and highlights the potential and limits to a widely available bioindicator of metal pollution.

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 October 2016
Published date: 1 January 2017
Keywords: Biomonitoring, Manila clam, Poole Harbour, Gametogenesis, Condition index, Invasive species
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Centre for Environmental Science, Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit, Marine Biology & Ecology, Education Hub

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404814
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404814
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: fd5c300d-9b2b-4bf1-bcd9-eb7f671cf945
ORCID for A.C. Jensen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8924-1198
ORCID for Ian Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jan 2017 16:53
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 01:47

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Contributors

Author: Malcolm Hudson
Author: James, Francis Price Oaten
Author: A.C. Jensen ORCID iD
Author: Ian Williams ORCID iD

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