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Targeting cell surface receptors for axon regeneration in the central nervous system

Targeting cell surface receptors for axon regeneration in the central nervous system
Targeting cell surface receptors for axon regeneration in the central nervous system

Axon regeneration in the CNS is largely unsuccessful due to excess inhibitory extrinsic factors within lesion sites together with an intrinsic inability of neurons to regrow following injury. Recent work demonstrates that forced expression of certain neuronal transmembrane receptors can recapitulate neuronal growth resulting in successful growth within and through inhibitory lesion environments. More specifically, neuronal expression of integrin receptors such as alpha9beta1 integrin which binds the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C, trk receptors such as trkB which binds the neurotrophic factor BDNF, and receptor PTPσ which binds chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, have all been show to significantly enhance regeneration of injured axons. We discuss how reintroduction of these receptors in damaged neurons facilitates signalling from the internal environment of the cell with the external environment of the lesion milieu, effectively resulting in growth and repair following injury. In summary, we suggest an appropriate balance of intrinsic and extrinsic factors are required to obtain substantial axon regeneration.

axon regeneration, dorsal root ganglion, extracellular matrix, integrin, tenascin-c, trk receptors
1673-5374
1884-1887
Cheah, Menghon
dcd039ed-e63d-4447-8494-08405fca83ec
Andrews, Melissa R
ae987a2f-878e-4ae3-a7a3-a7170712096c
Cheah, Menghon
dcd039ed-e63d-4447-8494-08405fca83ec
Andrews, Melissa R
ae987a2f-878e-4ae3-a7a3-a7170712096c

Cheah, Menghon and Andrews, Melissa R (2017) Targeting cell surface receptors for axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Neural Regeneration Research, 11 (12), 1884-1887. (doi:10.4103/1673-5374.197079).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Axon regeneration in the CNS is largely unsuccessful due to excess inhibitory extrinsic factors within lesion sites together with an intrinsic inability of neurons to regrow following injury. Recent work demonstrates that forced expression of certain neuronal transmembrane receptors can recapitulate neuronal growth resulting in successful growth within and through inhibitory lesion environments. More specifically, neuronal expression of integrin receptors such as alpha9beta1 integrin which binds the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C, trk receptors such as trkB which binds the neurotrophic factor BDNF, and receptor PTPσ which binds chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, have all been show to significantly enhance regeneration of injured axons. We discuss how reintroduction of these receptors in damaged neurons facilitates signalling from the internal environment of the cell with the external environment of the lesion milieu, effectively resulting in growth and repair following injury. In summary, we suggest an appropriate balance of intrinsic and extrinsic factors are required to obtain substantial axon regeneration.

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Revised manuscript (1Dec) with figures.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 January 2017
Published date: 5 January 2017
Keywords: axon regeneration, dorsal root ganglion, extracellular matrix, integrin, tenascin-c, trk receptors
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404978
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404978
ISSN: 1673-5374
PURE UUID: ff81bbe6-38af-42aa-bbd4-3dacff2c4175
ORCID for Melissa R Andrews: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5960-5619

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jan 2017 15:03
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:14

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