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Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and the development of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes.

Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and the development of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes.
Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and the development of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes.
Obesity is increasing in prevalence in many countries around the world. Its causes have been traditionally ascribed to a model where energy intake exceeds energy consumption. Reduced energy output in the form of exercise is associated with less sun exposure as many of these activities occur outdoors. This review explores the potential for ultraviolet radiation (UVR), derived from sun exposure, to affect the development of obesity and two of its metabolic co-morbidities, type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We here discuss the potential benefits (or otherwise) of exposure to UVR based on evidence from pre-clinical, human epidemiological and clinical studies and explore and compare the potential role of UVR-induced mediators, including vitamin D and nitric oxide. Overall, emerging findings suggest a protective role for UVR and sun exposure in reducing the development of obesity and cardiometabolic dysfunction, but more epidemiological and clinical research is required that focuses on measuring the direct associations and effects of exposure to UVR in humans.
1474-905X
1-12
Gorman, Shelley
011f6b03-7b50-4c96-ab5e-9b0f6cc5c25d
Lucas, Robyn
27c400ba-8dab-46c4-81d9-a49dbe42f40c
Allen-Hall, Aidan
cafd2551-005f-4194-a8de-b3631854a065
Fleury, Naomi
64f00027-4ad6-4b2f-a469-1d9eff9157f8
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Gorman, Shelley
011f6b03-7b50-4c96-ab5e-9b0f6cc5c25d
Lucas, Robyn
27c400ba-8dab-46c4-81d9-a49dbe42f40c
Allen-Hall, Aidan
cafd2551-005f-4194-a8de-b3631854a065
Fleury, Naomi
64f00027-4ad6-4b2f-a469-1d9eff9157f8
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd

Gorman, Shelley, Lucas, Robyn, Allen-Hall, Aidan, Fleury, Naomi and Feelisch, Martin (2016) Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and the development of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes. Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, 1-12. (doi:10.1039/C6PP00274A).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Obesity is increasing in prevalence in many countries around the world. Its causes have been traditionally ascribed to a model where energy intake exceeds energy consumption. Reduced energy output in the form of exercise is associated with less sun exposure as many of these activities occur outdoors. This review explores the potential for ultraviolet radiation (UVR), derived from sun exposure, to affect the development of obesity and two of its metabolic co-morbidities, type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We here discuss the potential benefits (or otherwise) of exposure to UVR based on evidence from pre-clinical, human epidemiological and clinical studies and explore and compare the potential role of UVR-induced mediators, including vitamin D and nitric oxide. Overall, emerging findings suggest a protective role for UVR and sun exposure in reducing the development of obesity and cardiometabolic dysfunction, but more epidemiological and clinical research is required that focuses on measuring the direct associations and effects of exposure to UVR in humans.

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2016_GORMAN_251116-accepted version with figs.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 December 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405124
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405124
ISSN: 1474-905X
PURE UUID: 115a927a-aa57-4642-a200-e79857b8ef04
ORCID for Martin Feelisch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-1158

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jan 2017 11:29
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 06:21

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