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Critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids

Critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids
Critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids
We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions—in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space—and in supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal: they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a nonspinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement of our numerical data with new closed-form extensions of power-law scalings that describe the mass and angular momentum of rotating black holes formed close to criticality.
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Baumgarte, Thomas W.
fa9007a1-bb4a-4527-b199-5fc26e0ff89c
Gundlach, Carsten
586f1eb5-3185-4b2b-8656-c29c436040fc
Baumgarte, Thomas W.
fa9007a1-bb4a-4527-b199-5fc26e0ff89c
Gundlach, Carsten
586f1eb5-3185-4b2b-8656-c29c436040fc

Baumgarte, Thomas W. and Gundlach, Carsten (2016) Critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. Physical Review Letters, 116 (22), 1-5. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.221103).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions—in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space—and in supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal: they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a nonspinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement of our numerical data with new closed-form extensions of power-law scalings that describe the mass and angular momentum of rotating black holes formed close to criticality.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 June 2016
Published date: 3 June 2016
Organisations: Applied Mathematics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405144
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405144
PURE UUID: 4cc47bbd-6cc1-486d-87d0-b0b7aafb7f9d
ORCID for Carsten Gundlach: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9585-5375

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jan 2017 13:35
Last modified: 20 Jul 2018 00:34

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