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Extracurricular activity participation moderates impact of family and school factors on adolescents’ disruptive behavioural problems

Extracurricular activity participation moderates impact of family and school factors on adolescents’ disruptive behavioural problems
Extracurricular activity participation moderates impact of family and school factors on adolescents’ disruptive behavioural problems
Background

The prevalence of problem behaviours among British adolescents has increased in the past decades. Following Erikson’s psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner’s developmental ecological model, it was hypothesized that youth problem behaviour is shaped in part by social environment. The aim of this project was to explore potential protective factors within the social environment of British youth’s for the presentation of disruptive behavioural problems.

Method

This study used secondary data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England, a cohort study of secondary school students. These data were analysed with generalized estimation equations to take the correlation between the longitudinal observations into account. Three models were built. The first model determined the effect of family, school, and extracurricular setting on presentation of disruptive behavioural problems. The second model expanded the first model by assuming extracurricular activities as protective factors that moderated the interaction between family and school factors with disruptive behavioural problems. The third model described the effect of prior disruptive behaviour on current disruptive behaviour.

Results

Associations were found between school factors, family factors, involvement in extracurricular activities and presence of disruptive behavioural problems. Results from the second generalized estimating equation (GEE) logistic regression models indicated that extracurricular activities buffered the impact of school and family factors on the presence of disruptive behavioural problems. For instance, participation in sports activities decreased the effect of bullying on psychological distress. Results from the third model indicated that prior acts of disruptive behaviour reinforced current disruptive behaviour.

Conclusion

This study supports Erikson’s psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner’s developmental ecological model; social environment did influence the presence of disruptive behavioural problems for British adolescents. The potential of extracurricular activities to intervention strategies addressing disruptive behavioural problems of adolescents is discussed.
1471-2458
1-13
Driessens, Corine M.E.F.
59335f14-4ead-4692-9969-7ed9cc1ccf08
Driessens, Corine M.E.F.
59335f14-4ead-4692-9969-7ed9cc1ccf08

Driessens, Corine M.E.F. (2015) Extracurricular activity participation moderates impact of family and school factors on adolescents’ disruptive behavioural problems. BMC Public Health, 15 (1110), 1-13. (doi:10.1186/s12889-015-2464-0). (PMID:26558510)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

The prevalence of problem behaviours among British adolescents has increased in the past decades. Following Erikson’s psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner’s developmental ecological model, it was hypothesized that youth problem behaviour is shaped in part by social environment. The aim of this project was to explore potential protective factors within the social environment of British youth’s for the presentation of disruptive behavioural problems.

Method

This study used secondary data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England, a cohort study of secondary school students. These data were analysed with generalized estimation equations to take the correlation between the longitudinal observations into account. Three models were built. The first model determined the effect of family, school, and extracurricular setting on presentation of disruptive behavioural problems. The second model expanded the first model by assuming extracurricular activities as protective factors that moderated the interaction between family and school factors with disruptive behavioural problems. The third model described the effect of prior disruptive behaviour on current disruptive behaviour.

Results

Associations were found between school factors, family factors, involvement in extracurricular activities and presence of disruptive behavioural problems. Results from the second generalized estimating equation (GEE) logistic regression models indicated that extracurricular activities buffered the impact of school and family factors on the presence of disruptive behavioural problems. For instance, participation in sports activities decreased the effect of bullying on psychological distress. Results from the third model indicated that prior acts of disruptive behaviour reinforced current disruptive behaviour.

Conclusion

This study supports Erikson’s psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner’s developmental ecological model; social environment did influence the presence of disruptive behavioural problems for British adolescents. The potential of extracurricular activities to intervention strategies addressing disruptive behavioural problems of adolescents is discussed.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 October 2015
Published date: 11 November 2015
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405213
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405213
ISSN: 1471-2458
PURE UUID: 6d7409e5-64ec-4ca1-abe7-071c265895b8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jan 2017 14:14
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 05:24

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Contributors

Author: Corine M.E.F. Driessens

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