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Impact of ageing and a synbiotic on the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccination; a randomised controlled trial

Impact of ageing and a synbiotic on the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccination; a randomised controlled trial
Impact of ageing and a synbiotic on the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccination; a randomised controlled trial
Background & Aims: Ageing increases risk of respiratory infections and impairs the response to influenza vaccination. Pre- and probiotics offer an opportunity to modulate anti-viral defenses and the response to vaccination via alteration of the gut microbiota. This study investigated the effect of a novel probiotic, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486, combined with a prebiotic, gluco-oligosaccharide, on the B and T cell response to seasonal influenza vaccination in young and older subjects.

Methods: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 58 young (18-35y) and 54 older (60-85y) subjects were supplemented with the synbiotic for 8 weeks. At 4 weeks they were administered with a seasonal influenza vaccine. B and T cell phenotype and responsiveness to in vitro re-stimulation with the vaccine were assessed at baseline, 4, 6 and 8 weeks.

Results: B and T cell profiles differed markedly between young and older subjects. Vaccination increased numbers of memory, IgA+ memory, IgG+ memory and total IgG+ B cells in young subjects, but failed to do so in older subjects and did not significantly alter T cell subsets. Seroconversion to the H1N1 subunit in the older subjects was associated with higher post38 vaccination numbers of plasma B cells, but seroconversion was less consistently associated with T cell phenotype. B and T cell subsets from both young and older subjects demonstrated a strong antigen-specific recall challenge, and although not influenced by age, responsiveness to the recall challenge was associated with seroconversion. In older subjects, CMV seropositivity was associated with a significantly lower recall response to the vaccine, but the synbiotic did not affect the responsiveness of B or T cells to re-stimulation with influenza vaccine.

Conclusions: Antigen-specific B and T cell activation following an in vitro recall challenge with the influenza vaccine was influenced by CMV seropositivity, but not by a synbiotic.
Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT01066377.
0261-5614
1-33
Enani, Sumaia
c515f9bc-8172-462c-a080-07630ca74a41
Przemska-Kosicka, Agnieszka
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Childs, Caroline
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Maidens, Catherine
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Dong, Honglin
f53fbe79-755b-4544-b2a7-79d2ba8a6a7f
Conterno, Lorenza
d4369090-808d-45a5-9c5e-8e8c15de6ba0
Tuohy, Kieran
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Todd, Susan
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Gosney, Margot
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Yaqoob, Parveen
3a418e24-bbf0-4b31-9df8-ca8514885c82
Enani, Sumaia
c515f9bc-8172-462c-a080-07630ca74a41
Przemska-Kosicka, Agnieszka
5002ba00-920f-4772-8304-602b3ab9b570
Childs, Caroline
ea17ccc1-2eac-4f67-96c7-a0c4d9dfd9c5
Maidens, Catherine
131c3ee6-370e-4e79-8144-01bae7176d25
Dong, Honglin
f53fbe79-755b-4544-b2a7-79d2ba8a6a7f
Conterno, Lorenza
d4369090-808d-45a5-9c5e-8e8c15de6ba0
Tuohy, Kieran
c68343d9-e2d4-4609-b75b-40289a34bf70
Todd, Susan
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Gosney, Margot
b2e1f968-fac0-4e83-a686-407025e0143a
Yaqoob, Parveen
3a418e24-bbf0-4b31-9df8-ca8514885c82

Enani, Sumaia, Przemska-Kosicka, Agnieszka, Childs, Caroline, Maidens, Catherine, Dong, Honglin, Conterno, Lorenza, Tuohy, Kieran, Todd, Susan, Gosney, Margot and Yaqoob, Parveen (2017) Impact of ageing and a synbiotic on the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccination; a randomised controlled trial. Clinical Nutrition, 1-33. (doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2017.01.011).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background & Aims: Ageing increases risk of respiratory infections and impairs the response to influenza vaccination. Pre- and probiotics offer an opportunity to modulate anti-viral defenses and the response to vaccination via alteration of the gut microbiota. This study investigated the effect of a novel probiotic, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486, combined with a prebiotic, gluco-oligosaccharide, on the B and T cell response to seasonal influenza vaccination in young and older subjects.

Methods: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 58 young (18-35y) and 54 older (60-85y) subjects were supplemented with the synbiotic for 8 weeks. At 4 weeks they were administered with a seasonal influenza vaccine. B and T cell phenotype and responsiveness to in vitro re-stimulation with the vaccine were assessed at baseline, 4, 6 and 8 weeks.

Results: B and T cell profiles differed markedly between young and older subjects. Vaccination increased numbers of memory, IgA+ memory, IgG+ memory and total IgG+ B cells in young subjects, but failed to do so in older subjects and did not significantly alter T cell subsets. Seroconversion to the H1N1 subunit in the older subjects was associated with higher post38 vaccination numbers of plasma B cells, but seroconversion was less consistently associated with T cell phenotype. B and T cell subsets from both young and older subjects demonstrated a strong antigen-specific recall challenge, and although not influenced by age, responsiveness to the recall challenge was associated with seroconversion. In older subjects, CMV seropositivity was associated with a significantly lower recall response to the vaccine, but the synbiotic did not affect the responsiveness of B or T cells to re-stimulation with influenza vaccine.

Conclusions: Antigen-specific B and T cell activation following an in vitro recall challenge with the influenza vaccine was influenced by CMV seropositivity, but not by a synbiotic.
Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT01066377.

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Accepted/In Press date: 20 January 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 January 2017
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405261
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405261
ISSN: 0261-5614
PURE UUID: cb79d881-15f9-4b43-a796-3754baa3e753
ORCID for Caroline Childs: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6832-224X

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Date deposited: 02 Feb 2017 10:18
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:11

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Contributors

Author: Sumaia Enani
Author: Agnieszka Przemska-Kosicka
Author: Caroline Childs ORCID iD
Author: Catherine Maidens
Author: Honglin Dong
Author: Lorenza Conterno
Author: Kieran Tuohy
Author: Susan Todd
Author: Margot Gosney
Author: Parveen Yaqoob

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