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Youth social citizenship and class inequalities in transitions to adulthood in the UK

Youth social citizenship and class inequalities in transitions to adulthood in the UK
Youth social citizenship and class inequalities in transitions to adulthood in the UK
This paper reconsiders youth transition regime literature in the context of recent changes to Government policies in the age at which young adults are deemed independent of their parents, the privatization of the funding of higher education, and the current housing crisis. We provide new evidence regarding class inequalities in transitions to adulthood over the past twenty-five years. All social classes have seen a delay in some transitions such as getting a full time job, and becoming a home owner. Class differences in the likelihood of remaining in the parental home have widened. Regardless of social background, having a degree remains key to avoid precarious employment, but within the graduate and nongraduate groups there are class inequalities in the likelihood of being unemployed, or in a routine job. Despite the recent postponement of motherhood among disadvantaged groups, the timing and partnership context of motherhood remains strongly class stratified.
81
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Duta, Adriana
81955d1d-f918-4b2e-b1c4-59af9fc30da8
Wakeling, Paul
89db95f1-e452-41a3-bb5a-34ed6ade7665
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Duta, Adriana
81955d1d-f918-4b2e-b1c4-59af9fc30da8
Wakeling, Paul
89db95f1-e452-41a3-bb5a-34ed6ade7665
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2

Berrington, Ann, Duta, Adriana and Wakeling, Paul , Mcgowan, Teresa (ed.) (2017) Youth social citizenship and class inequalities in transitions to adulthood in the UK (ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Papers, 81) Southampton, GB. ESRC Centre for Population Change 41pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

This paper reconsiders youth transition regime literature in the context of recent changes to Government policies in the age at which young adults are deemed independent of their parents, the privatization of the funding of higher education, and the current housing crisis. We provide new evidence regarding class inequalities in transitions to adulthood over the past twenty-five years. All social classes have seen a delay in some transitions such as getting a full time job, and becoming a home owner. Class differences in the likelihood of remaining in the parental home have widened. Regardless of social background, having a degree remains key to avoid precarious employment, but within the graduate and nongraduate groups there are class inequalities in the likelihood of being unemployed, or in a routine job. Despite the recent postponement of motherhood among disadvantaged groups, the timing and partnership context of motherhood remains strongly class stratified.

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Published date: 30 January 2017
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography, Centre for Population Change

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405269
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405269
PURE UUID: 9aa726e2-ff06-4c3e-badc-17da1f02ec6c

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Date deposited: 02 Feb 2017 11:20
Last modified: 03 Oct 2017 16:32

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Contributors

Author: Ann Berrington
Author: Adriana Duta
Author: Paul Wakeling
Editor: Teresa Mcgowan

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