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Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-related activity: Randomized controlled trial

Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-related activity: Randomized controlled trial
Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-related activity: Randomized controlled trial
People with chronic musculoskeletal pain often experience pain-related fear of movement and avoidance behavior. The Fear-Avoidance model proposes a possible mechanism at least partly explaining the development and maintenance of chronic pain. People who interpret pain during movement as being potentially harmful to the organism may initiate a vicious behavioral cycle by generating pain-related fear of movement accompanied by avoidance behavior and hyper-vigilance.This study investigates whether an individually adapted multifactorial approach comprised of biopsychosocial elements, with a focus on physical exercise, mindfulness, and education on pain and behavior, can decrease work-related fear-avoidance beliefs. As part of a large scale 10-week worksite randomized controlled intervention trial focusing on company initiatives to combat work-related musculoskeletal pain and stress, we evaluated fear-avoidance behavior in 112 female laboratory technicians with chronic neck, shoulder, upper back, lower back, elbow, and hand/wrist pain using the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire at baseline, before group allocation, and again at the post intervention follow-up 10 weeks later.A significant group by time interaction was observed P < 0.05 for work-related fear-avoidance beliefs. The between-group difference at follow-up was -2.2 (-4.0 to -0.5), corresponding to a small to medium effect size (Cohen's d = 0.30).Our study shows that work-related, but not leisure time activity-related, fear-avoidance beliefs, as assessed by the Fear-avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, can be significantly reduced by 10 weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training in female laboratory technicians with chronic pain.
1357-3039
e3945
Jay, Kenneth
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Brandt, Mikkel
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Jakobsen, Markus Due
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Sundstrup, Emil
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Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese
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schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f
Sjøgaard, Gisela
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Andersen, Lars L
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Jay, Kenneth, Brandt, Mikkel, Jakobsen, Markus Due, Sundstrup, Emil, Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese, schraefel, m.c., Sjøgaard, Gisela and Andersen, Lars L (2016) Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-related activity: Randomized controlled trial Medicine, 95, (34), e3945.

Jay, Kenneth, Brandt, Mikkel, Jakobsen, Markus Due, Sundstrup, Emil, Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese, schraefel, m.c., Sjøgaard, Gisela and Andersen, Lars L (2016) Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-related activity: Randomized controlled trial Medicine, 95, (34), e3945.

Record type: Article

Abstract

People with chronic musculoskeletal pain often experience pain-related fear of movement and avoidance behavior. The Fear-Avoidance model proposes a possible mechanism at least partly explaining the development and maintenance of chronic pain. People who interpret pain during movement as being potentially harmful to the organism may initiate a vicious behavioral cycle by generating pain-related fear of movement accompanied by avoidance behavior and hyper-vigilance.This study investigates whether an individually adapted multifactorial approach comprised of biopsychosocial elements, with a focus on physical exercise, mindfulness, and education on pain and behavior, can decrease work-related fear-avoidance beliefs. As part of a large scale 10-week worksite randomized controlled intervention trial focusing on company initiatives to combat work-related musculoskeletal pain and stress, we evaluated fear-avoidance behavior in 112 female laboratory technicians with chronic neck, shoulder, upper back, lower back, elbow, and hand/wrist pain using the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire at baseline, before group allocation, and again at the post intervention follow-up 10 weeks later.A significant group by time interaction was observed P < 0.05 for work-related fear-avoidance beliefs. The between-group difference at follow-up was -2.2 (-4.0 to -0.5), corresponding to a small to medium effect size (Cohen's d = 0.30).Our study shows that work-related, but not leisure time activity-related, fear-avoidance beliefs, as assessed by the Fear-avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, can be significantly reduced by 10 weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training in female laboratory technicians with chronic pain.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 May 2016
Published date: 1 August 2016
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405297
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405297
ISSN: 1357-3039
PURE UUID: ea78f81f-f974-4522-baac-efe9a59d6ceb

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Date deposited: 31 Jan 2017 12:20
Last modified: 11 Nov 2017 13:15

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Contributors

Author: Kenneth Jay
Author: Mikkel Brandt
Author: Markus Due Jakobsen
Author: Emil Sundstrup
Author: Kasper Gymoese Berthelsen
Author: m.c. schraefel
Author: Gisela Sjøgaard
Author: Lars L Andersen

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